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Jason_Williams

Japanese Airplane Reference Materials

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Just a thing: I hope we will see in the game the reference to the official japanese nomenclature (even just the english translation, no need for having kanji everywhere). It would be nice to have them instead the reference to the allied code names (unless the material is made to reproduce an allied point of view for exapmle in missions etc. etc.).

Edited by Alexmarine28

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Museums typically DO NOT offer their examples for use by sim developers WITHOUT major financial offerings. Which I cannot afford. 99% of the time they just ignore my requests. If anyone can get me in the door with a camera and a tape measure that's great, but I have tried for years and gotten nowhere. Neither Planes of Fame or any other museum or collection is very welcoming to me climbing around their cockpits taking pictures for a commercial project they are not involved with and without a $1 million insurance policy. I got access to the P-40 at Yanks in Chino and the whole effort was a hassle and a disaster, so not looking to repeat that again. But again, if any of you have access or can make it happen I am willing to show up or hire you to help do the research, but I'm not going that route myself at the moment.

 

Jason

In refrance to this post my father recently sold a gryphon spitfire engine to the Paul Allan collection I might be able to pull some strings for pictures and info on his aircraft.

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Basic setup of a D3A1 Vals cockpit layout and val gunner position.

Do note that a vals gunner seat was a swivel seat. which with the canopy behind closed he would swivel around and focus on the radio communications and navigations, as well as using the bombsight


i also had the chance to go inside a being restored TBM and i have photos of the interior gun crew positions as well as of inside the bombay
 

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Edited by Kiwi92
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Look at a 3D model of the typical japanese level bomb sight used both in the Val and Kate which would be visible to the player from the gunner position of the Val and if moddled, the navigators position of the Kate 

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Edited by Kiwi92

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Hello,

 

I was combing through the internet trying to find some info regarding the G4M interior and stumbled upon a few books I think may help the team get a picture of what these machines looked like inside and out.  More importantly, how their equipment functioned and how they differed from their Allied counterparts.  On top of getting the exterior models accurate, getting the interior is something I imagine will be even more difficult.  Particularly, learning about the procedures or gauges that occupied the Japanese pilot's mind whilst in flight.  I think these books (particularly the one on equipments) will be real fascinating stuff.

 

These books were both written by a Robert C. Mikesh.  Veteran USAF pilot who flew in Korea and Vietnam then worked at the Smithsonian for a few decades.  Most of his work covers Japanese military aviation.

 

Here is a list of books he's written on Amazon.

 

*The scribd links provide "samples" of the books, but you can literally scroll through the entire book whilst some "free trial" registration covers the page but you'll still be able to read the pages and pictures.

 

1. Japanese Aircraft Equipment: 1940-1945 (Schiffer Military History) (2014)

https://www.scribd.com/document/210137613/Japanese-Aircraft-Equipment-1940-1945

 

Description:

As a companion book to the previously published Japanese Aircraft Interiors, by the same author, this book defines more closely the equipment that outfitted these aircraft. There are chapters on such aircraft installed equipment as instruments, radios, cameras, machine guns and cannons, gunsights and bombsights used by the Japanese Army and Navy air forces. The opening chapter describes the history as to how much of this equipment was captured and now is in the hands of collectors and museums. The closing chapter has additional information on colors and coatings used in these interiors. This information will aid collectors to more definitively identify equipment that may not otherwise be clearly marked. Experts in these respective fields have been major contributors.

 

Review:

"Japanese Aircraft Equipment 1940-1945" by Robert C. Mikesh offers a unique glimpse into the cockpit interiors and equipment used by the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy Air Forces during the Second World War. It is packed with photographs, drawings, and descriptions of this equipment which should be useful to modelers as well as aviation buffs. This includes instrumentation, radio equipment, radars, aerial cameras, machine guns, gunsights, and bombsights. The only kind of information missing is on engines, which arguably could be covered by a book of this type. In short, this book is a "must have" for aviation enthusiasts."

 

 

2. Japanese Aircraft Interiors 1940-1945 (2001)

https://www.scribd.com/document/208589650/Monogram-Japanese-Aircraft-Interiors-1940-1945

 

Description:

This book is about the interiors of Japanese Army and Navy aircraft flown during the Second World War. It is a detailed survey covering crew stations, instrumentation and other equipment commonly associated within the interior of military aircraft. For quick reference, each aircraft discussed is shown by at least one external overall photograph. Interior colors are also shown and discussed. This is the only English language book of its type in-print today. Fighters, night fighters, jet and rocket special attack aircraft, bombers, reconnaissance aircraft and seaplanes of the Imperial Army and Navy are fully covered.

 

Review:

Couldn't find any reviews for this one.

 

I'm not trying to sell this author but I think judging by his work and reputation, it would be a shame to not at least consider his stuff.  Below are the covers, I could not find any pics from within these books sorry.

 

 

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1. Japanese Aircraft Equipment: 1940-1945 (Schiffer Military History) (2014)

https://www.scribd.com/document/210137613/Japanese-Aircraft-Equipment-1940-1945

 

2. Japanese Aircraft Interiors 1940-1945 (2001)

https://www.scribd.com/document/208589650/Monogram-Japanese-Aircraft-Interiors-1940-1945

 

 

The first cover looks familiar to me. I have the digital full version of the book on my external hard disk. :)

I also found another book about Japanese aircraft interiors on the disk.

 

Both books in one download:

http://www.mediafire.com/file/hl2maxx8a526uq2/Japanese_Aircrafts.7z

Edited by Uufflakke

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check out this site for some historic skins of the midway era. axis. this guy did some great research. I researched on there for some campaigns that i made. great stuff if i recall:

 

http://www.asisbiz.com/il2.html

 

That webiste rips off other sites of their material and gives no credit for what was taken. 

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That webiste rips off other sites of their material and gives no credit for what was taken. 

 

Hmm. Also looks like most of the stuff I used is gone. i.e. all the Akagi, Kaga, Soryu and Hiryu skins. perhaps a swing and a miss.  

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Hmm. Also looks like most of the stuff I used is gone. i.e. all the Akagi, Kaga, Soryu and Hiryu skins. perhaps a swing and a miss.  

 

Ok I found what i was looking for, may save some effort for research re skins on the carrier group at midway.  the skins referenced were done by the great skinner RONNCO, and yes prob not credited at that site

 

a4rifo.jpg

 

Another link here: 

http://www.mission4today.com/index.php?name=Downloads2&file=details&id=3935

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Jason, there's an actual flying example of Zeke here locally...Paul Allen's collection in Everette.

I'm not sure if I can get permission to get up inside and take photos, but if there's a need I'll look into the prospect...can't hurt to ask.

They might be able to provide other information as well...I'm not sure how accessible these people are at this point - but in any case I'm close.

 

Who knows you might contact them and set up an appointment as well at some point.

Anyway, let me know if you want me to do some investigating.

 

Museums typically DO NOT offer their examples for use by sim developers WITHOUT major financial offerings. Which I cannot afford. 99% of the time they just ignore my requests. If anyone can get me in the door with a camera and a tape measure that's great, but I have tried for years and gotten nowhere. Neither Planes of Fame or any other museum or collection is very welcoming to me climbing around their cockpits taking pictures for a commercial project they are not involved with and without a $1 million insurance policy. I got access to the P-40 at Yanks in Chino and the whole effort was a hassle and a disaster, so not looking to repeat that again. But again, if any of you have access or can make it happen I am willing to show up or hire you to help do the research, but I'm not going that route myself at the moment.

 

Jason

 

I've done some volunteering up there with that collection, and they don't let the volunteers near the aircraft either - for understandable reasons.  I am surprised that this has been your experience with museums.  While I can understand that they don't have any compelling reason to do something like this, I would think that the enthusiasts among the staff would see the attraction of such an offering, in that it allows others that will never take a seat in the cockpit of one of these birds to experience something as authentic and close to life-like as possible.

 

That said, I have no idea what their response to a query like this would be.  I would think the best bet would be to schmooze one of the pilots or mechanics to take some pictures and get some measurements from inside the craft for you.  Yeah, I know, easier said than done - and I have no idea what kind of agreements the FTE's of this museum have to sign to work there, so their hands might be tied in that regard.  While substantial financial offerings are indeed a bit of a deal breaker in this regard, if it's within your power, you might be able to provide an offer of IL-2 game licenses for the Museum's simulator bank in exchange for something like this.  They're still using 1946, and while the IL2:BoS, BoM, and BoK offerings don't align as well with their collection of aircraft, it may still provide enough of a mutually beneficial arrangement for them to bite, especially considering that IL2's lineup is constantly expanding.

 

I am sure there are ways to get this accomplished, however climbing around in the cockpits of these birds yourself is almost certainly out of the question.  From your experience, it sounds like it's almost always more trouble than it's worth, which is a bit disheartening.

 

Anyway, I'm probably done volunteering for the season up there, but I'd be willing to try and help however possible.

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There can be no real Battle of Midway without Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully's "Shattered Sword" book, period!

"How do we replicate faulty Japanese radio communications?"  :P

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"Kobayashi I didn't copy...say again! Kobayashi repeat!...Kobayashi.... KOBAYASHI!!!!!!"

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I dont know if anyone has posted this yet but teh folks over at J-Aircraft:

 

http://www.j-aircraft.org/smf/index.php

 

Are extremely knowledgeable, and have may Japanese references at their disposal, this includes of course Japanese speaking/reading members with access to original source material.

 

The Axis History sight:

 

https://forum.axishistory.com/

 

Also has a similar cadre of bi lingual contributors

 

I have personally used bot sights for research for games in the past that I helped to work on like War In the pacific Adermals addition and for flight sims that I was an avid member of, granted those flight sims were no where near the Quality of Il2, but they sights above were very helpful in providing technical data on a great many aircraft.

 

Pretty much every Japanese aircraft you could want to model was extensively tested by all the warring powers at one point so performance data can found from a Varity of sources, I would be surprised if the Russian did not at some point test Japanese aircraft them slefs.

 

Their are so many great potential match up possible with a pacific Theater offshoot of this game, just think of:

 

China- Nates and I 152, I16, A5M

 

China Burma India, Oscars, Brewsters, Huricans, P40, Nates

 

Malaya, Dutch East Indies, Zeros added to the above list

 

Above is of course a very abbreviated list but the potential beyond just the Obvious Midway/Okinawa battles is enormous, Just doing a Solomon's Map with out Aircraft carriers would be a huge draw and possibly be an easer development cycle then doing carriers at first, A map from Babul to the Guadalcanal would be a big seller in the states i am Shure. Alternatively doing NEW Gunie with Buna and lae and Port Morsbey would make for fun fights.

 

I am not saying abandon Aircraft cariers entirely just creating an island map with the aircraft would get the ball roleing and you add aircraft carriers later.

 

Pluss Sea planes would be a fun addition to finial have, I figured we would see one or two modeled for Kuban at some point.

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Some of the best Aircraft publications in the world today (and for some timenow) are japanese:

 

https://www.amazon.co.jp/gp/product/4893190164/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

https://www.amazon.co.jp/MILITARY-CLASSICS-%E3%83%9F%E3%83%AA%E3%82%BF%E3%83%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%83%BB%E3%82%AF%E3%83%A9%E3%82%B7%E3%83%83%E3%82%AF%E3%82%B9-2017%E5%B9%B412%E6%9C%88/dp/B075YS4YNY/ref=pd_sim_14_24?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=0F1QYKC58EM08CBBCNQ9

 

https://www.amazon.co.jp/%E4%B8%96%E7%95%8C%E3%81%AE%E5%82%91%E4%BD%9C%E6%A9%9F%E3%82%B9%E3%83%9A%E3%82%B7%E3%83%A3%E3%83%AB%E3%83%BB%E3%82%A8%E3%83%87%E3%82%A3%E3%82%B7%E3%83%A7%E3%83%B3Vol-6-%E9%9B%B6%E5%BC%8F%E8%89%A6%E4%B8%8A%E6%88%A6%E9%97%98%E6%A9%9F-%E4%B8%96%E7%95%8C%E3%81%AE%E5%82%91%E4%BD%9C%E6%A9%9F%E3%82%B9%E3%83%9A%E3%82%B7%E3%83%A3%E3%83%AB%E3%83%BB%E3%82%A8%E3%83%87%E3%82%A3%E3%82%B7%E3%83%A7%E3%83%B3-Vol-6/dp/4893192086/ref=pd_sim_14_25?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=STECTYXGFNF2448YJDHN

https://www.amazon.co.jp/%E9%8A%80%E6%B2%B3-%E4%B8%80%E5%BC%8F%E9%99%B8%E6%94%BB-%E3%83%8F%E3%83%B3%E3%83%87%E3%82%A3%E5%88%A4%E5%9B%B3%E8%A7%A3%E3%83%BB%E8%BB%8D%E7%94%A8%E6%A9%9F%E3%82%B7%E3%83%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%82%BA-%E9%9B%91%E8%AA%8C%E3%80%8C%E4%B8%B8%E3%80%8D%E7%B7%A8%E9%9B%86%E9%83%A8/dp/4769809220/ref=pd_sim_14_15?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=1A9BH83496XXMP5GWVB1

 

https://www.amazon.co.jp/%E6%97%A5%E6%9C%AC%E9%99%B8%E6%B5%B7%E8%BB%8D%E6%A9%9F%E5%A4%A7%E5%9B%B3%E9%91%91-2015%E5%B9%B4-10-%E6%9C%88%E5%8F%B7-%E9%9B%91%E8%AA%8C/dp/B014TAYG7Y/ref=pd_sim_14_30?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=1A9BH83496XXMP5GWVB1

 

What I might suggest is to run an add in one or two of the leading Periodicals in the Japanese Aviation Buff realm and see if you can get a response back for more detailed info of the type your looking for, this would be very inexpensive and might yield a ton of info, IL2 is Know the world over for being the best Flight Sim period and I would imagine their are literally thousands of Japanese aviation enthusiasts that would help in anyway they could to bring some of these Iconic aircraft to life the way only IL2 can

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Jason, do you think it would be a good idea to have a thread dedicated to each Japanese plane you are interested in so the information can stay neatly organized?

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A6M model 21 "Zeke"

1. Cockpits

2. Engines

3. Systems

4. Performance

5. Construction

 

Worth to see the whole youtube video because they show historical documents, show how the plane works inside and outside, how the plane response to the pilots command with detailed information.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bdEEtGkJW8

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiTJFwE8DTI

 

 

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I remember reading a few years ago about a Zero restoration prodject in , I beelave it was califorina, and they had a technical manual for teh Zero they had, something almost as rare as the Zero its self, at any rate they took it to get it translated, turn out noboy that read japanese could translate it becuase it was writen in the 1940's and used a now defunct form of "Technical japanese", they eveunatial found an enginear who was alive in the 1940's who could translate it for them...

 

So i supose it realy depends on What kind of detail their looking for, for instrnace it might be hard for them find the info on say a Nate, or an A5M, but probbaly not on a Ki 84.

 

To Do Burma for example you would need Nate and Lilly and Sally info, Oscar as well, their were no Zero's in Burma so that theater might be off the table any time soon, but China in the late 30's and even early war would nneed the same set, of course their were Zero's in China.

 

I realy think the simplest match up would be a Gudacanal Map and a few planes to get the ball roling and the money roling in, and all the Planes involved were extensively tested by The US and British and are very well know aircraft so their should be, at least one would hope, ampel referance material at hand.

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Stumbeled apon this its a brief description of the Landing light syatem the IJN used to recover aircraft, they did not use a batman, like the USN navy did.

 

http://nauticos.com/wp-nauticos/ijn-carrier-wreckage-identification-analysis-report/

 

 

 

Landing Light Arrays

 

Japanese aircraft carriers carried landing aides to help pilots determine whether or not their landing approach was correct in terms of both descent angle and angle relative to the centerline of the flight deck. The equipment used was a set of colored lights (red and green) which were aimed at different angles upwards and over the stern of the ship. The lights themselves were carried atop a hinged supporting arm. Often, the arm was affixed to the antiaircraft machine gun galleries, either to the gallery structure or an actual gun tub. However, landing light arrays could also be attached to other platforms on the side of the ship.

 

When the lights were in use, the arm was folded outward perpendicular to the flight deck. The arm and lights could be folded flat against the side of the ship when not in use.

 

Each carrier typically carried several sets of lights (4 sets being a common number). The positioning of the lights themselves was distinct to each carrier. From the available sources, we know the position of Akagi’s landing light arrays very precisely, Kaga’s less so, and Sôryû’s hardly at all. The following pictures help illustrate how such arrays were carried and used aboard ship.

 

https://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=65&t=231904

 

https://forum.axishistory.com/download/file.php?id=410110&mode=view

 

 

http://bahia.gozaru.jp/topics/carrierland.html

 

Chakkan Shido To (Landing Leading System). It consisted of 照星灯 Shosei To (Front Sight Lights: Blue Lights) and 照門灯 Shomon To (Rear Sight Lights: Red Lights). The Pilot approaching to the aircraft carrier saw Blue Lights and Red Lights at the same time. He could determine if altitude and course are appropriate by their relative position.
 

Edited by BRADYS555
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A reference material I have lying around that has a good bit of info on Japanese aircraft:

 

The Rand McNally Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft: 1914 - 1980 

 

It has a bibliography that I suggest scanning through. I know encyclopedias are a little sophomoric as information pertaining to what you guys are trying to tackle but I think its worth having a copy at hand. 

 

Good luck! As a new member in the Il-2 community I look forward to the progress and direction of your team.

 

- Coleman

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So, I was gutted when I read about th PT, and am here to help in any way I can (probably won’t be much). We have a few stellar air museums in Oregon, and from what I gather, we’re lacking in information on the Japanese side?

 

One of our museums works to created 360 degree images of the cockpits, and while they only have an Oscar, there are Press this hat do this too and contribute to a larger overall library.

 

http://www.ericksoncollection.com/nakajima-ki-43-oscar-cockpit-360

 

 

I’m willing to reach out and shake a few trees ignore we need information and would like access to some of the birds? I know nothing about planes, but I’m an architect by trade and know how to get scale and documents exisitng conditions.

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This is the best book I've found comprising Japanese aircraft engines:

 

 

post-16698-0-64310800-1516398387_thumb.jpg

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Japanese Aircraft Equipment 1940-1945 by Robert. C. Mikesh

 

Schiffer Military History

 

is a very good 200 page resource with chapters on instruments, Instrument marking and placards, guns, gun sights, bombsights, radio equipment/Radar etc. and interior coatings and colours, all including Army and Navy variations

 

It also has a nice basic 'tutorial'  with translations and methodology to understand Army and Navy nomenclatures in instrument identifying and labeling

 

Cheers, Dakpilot

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