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II./JG1_Vonrd

Changing the "Wetlook"

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It seems to me that there is a default in the game that makes all the planes look like they just flew through a drenching rain.

 

I don't want this in my skins. I prefer a well worn matt or, at most semi-gloss look. It looks especially bad on skins that have weathering - oil stains, exhaust film, paint chips and general grime. It looks like someone took a well patinaed "rat rod" and applied about 5 coats of gloss clearcoat. 

 

I've been told that the alpha can change this but all my attempts at tweaking the alpha don't seem to get rid of this effect. If the alpha actually will eliminate the wetlook, can someone post an alpha that changes the appearance to flat so that I have an example to work with? Or tell me what the specific gray is that works.

 

I really hope that it isn't hard coded into the game engine. If it actually is, I would like to make an official request to change it. 

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With colors that are supposed to be more glossy I go with 12 to 15. I use 5 for exhaust stains and 7 to 9 for matt paint. With bare metal I use 35 to 40.

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A lot of people agree the gloss is way overdone and it's been brought up to the devs but they are pretty set on it. In most wartime pictures you can see the paint is more matt when you compare the shine and reflections to the canopy glass.

Edited by BorysVorobyov

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A lot of people agree the gloss is way overdone and it's been brought up to the devs but they are pretty set on it. In most wartime pictures you can see the paint is more matt when you compare the shine and reflections to the canopy glass.

Yeah, that's pretty much what I thought. Realistically, I only really notice it in close formation (and the RARE occurrence when I get close enough to an enemy plane to get good hits   :rolleyes: ). Still, I would like my screenshots of my skin to reflect what I would like.

 

Once again... devs, please change the gloss.

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Let us know if you have any luck with the colors/settings BorysVorobyov suggested - I tried for a while (many months ago now) to tweak the alpha like it was possible to do in RoF, but never was able to find an acceptable solution so I finally gave up on it.

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~S~

I use a .bmp as the Alpha and layer it together with a skin bmp using a program called

dtxbmp

 

Making the alpha bmp, R,G,B 34 is right on the edge of holes, but the "wet look" is gone.

But things like tires, are still way too glossy...

 

II./JG1_Schulte "Moxy"

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With colors that are supposed to be more glossy I go with 12 to 15. I use 5 for exhaust stains and 7 to 9 for matt paint. With bare metal I use 35 to 40.

Way too matt in my opinion. Even military aircraft are not compeltely matt as this would ruin aerodynamics and they usually had protective coats that smoothed out surfaces and left a little shine.

 

Depending on the condition of the aircraft I use 25-29 as a base and put weathering layers above it (tuning it down as far as 15 in respective areas). With this technique you can easily switch between fresh and weathered paint states without altering the base colour.

 

For comparison, a vanilla alpha has an average of 35-40 base colour.

Edited by 6./ZG26_5tuka

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Way too matt in my opinion. Even military aircraft are not compeltely matt as this would ruin aerodynamics and they usually had protective coats that smoothed out surfaces and left a little shine.

 

Depending on the condition of the aircraft I use 25-29 as a base and put weathering layers above it (tuning it down as far as 15 in respective areas). With this technique you can easily switch between fresh and weathered paint states without altering the base colour.

 

For comparison, a vanilla alpha has an average of 35-40 base colour.

It all depends on the plane. Also the paint. Also the time period. I've seen some early MiGs with more gloss (still nowhere near as wet polished looking as default game skins). However, it's extremely rare for me to find glossy planes in wartime photographs. There were some Soviet paints in prewar and very early war that were gloss but those were replaced with matt paints. I used somewhere in the 20s for my early war "glossy" MiGs but that is still way too shiny for me. Zargos does a great job on alpha shine.

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That is remarkable - can't wait to see that alpha and figure out how to replicate the effect for the other plane types.

 

[EDIT] Guess I just hadn't been nuanced enough with earlier attempts (couldn't find a good middle ground before that dulled the wetness out without creating holes), but after reviewing that alpha I've had better luck getting rid of the wetness look on several of my other skins (e.g., for P-40).

 

So, thanks for bringing this back up as I'd really given up on it after my last attempts failed - liking this new look a lot better now.

Edited by TG-55Panthercules

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I believe that on most machines, especially those requiring speed, there was a deal of attention paid to the finish by the Groundcrew. Fine with the time to execute the polishing and painting but if the machine was out, back, refuelled, rearmed and then back out then there would have been massive variations in the finish. In game it's down to each individual with their custom skins but it was by no means 'uniform', even with two planes in the same unit. The Soviets for instance would apply all sorts of dilutions to paint depending on where they were and the amount of paint they had available and so one individual machine would have been widely varied even over one wing or tail, following repairs and repaint. Perfection and beauty or indeed in the eye(s) of the beholder.  :happy:

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I agree that the "wet reflections" seem a bit overdone, on a painted combat aircraft. However, i think many of the admittedly amazing skins produced by the generous artists here show too much weathering of paint, and not enough oil, exhaust stains and soot around the gunports. The weathering looks realistic, but  don't think most combat aircraft were in use long enough to become very weathered, other than by the dirt previously mentioned. I have a 40 year old plane which has 4,500 hours on the airframe, with original paint, which only shows a tiny fraction of the weathering that some skins have.

 

It is possible that wartime paint finishes were subpar, and easily flaked off; like the paint on a mid 1970's Ford pickup truck, which tended to fall off in sheets. The photos I have looked at from WWII seem to show more filthy airplanes, due to the field conditions there were in. Mud splatters, exhaust stains and oil streaks on the belly of the plane abound. Those stains are quite difficult to remove in real life, by the way...

 

Thank you to all the skinners!

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On 3/11/2018 at 1:03 PM, RothbardVso1*3 said:

I agree that the "wet reflections" seem a bit overdone, on a painted combat aircraft. However, i think many of the admittedly amazing skins produced by the generous artists here show too much weathering of paint, and not enough oil, exhaust stains and soot around the gunports. The weathering looks realistic, but  don't think most combat aircraft were in use long enough to become very weathered, other than by the dirt previously mentioned. I have a 40 year old plane which has 4,500 hours on the airframe, with original paint, which only shows a tiny fraction of the weathering that some skins have.

 

It is possible that wartime paint finishes were subpar, and easily flaked off; like the paint on a mid 1970's Ford pickup truck, which tended to fall off in sheets. The photos I have looked at from WWII seem to show more filthy airplanes, due to the field conditions there were in. Mud splatters, exhaust stains and oil streaks on the belly of the plane abound. Those stains are quite difficult to remove in real life, by the way...

 

Thank you to all the skinners!

 

Good points. As an aircraft mechanic I work on some real turds sometimes and there is very little paint chipping... mostly around fasteners and panels that get removed often and even so it's not much. Much more apparent is general grime, drips and stains. If the plane lives outdoors the formerly glossy paint is oxydized to matte and removing greasy fingerprints is impossible without resorting to rubbing compound. Also lots of bug splats on leading edges and windshields.

 

Back then they were probably not doing much in the way of prep before paint (and any painter will insist that prep is 90% of a good and durable paint job) so paint adhesion could be a problem. Especially for the Luftwaffe, I'm sure paint quality worsened since it is derived from petroleum of which they were running out. They were probably using lacquer or maybe solvent base enamel over metal surfaces and neither adhere well to aluminum without a primer (zinc chromate most likely). I'd bet that they often skimped on the primer and maybe didn't even bother with it at all in the later stages of the war. This would also contribute to shedding of the paint layer.

 

I'm going to do less in the chipping dept and up the grime. 

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Grime, grime grime, it's ALL in the grime. I love the grime, the more the merrier!!

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