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Can't keep 109 straight during take off.


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Hi!

 

I have huge problem to keep plane straight during the take-off. When I correct it with rudder to the right, it goes too right then I try to do same to left, then back to right.. and so on.

 

Should I change some settings on my pedals? 

Edited by LLv34_adexu
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here it is very similar as in the the life of the aircraft ...

You have to to control cravings, catch air currents, while the steering wheel will be obedient.

If you will not in the air flow, you will have a strong rolling.

 

Also, try to adjust the sensitivity of smoothing steering at the center.

again:

1. Control - revolutions motor. Do this gradually to feel the air flow.

2. controls - steering, need to do before he heard that a plane making reaction - let go. Do not wait If a desired way, feel his plane.

 

Also on models where it was better to use a locking rear wheels. This makes control during acceleration - better.

 

sorry my English, I use Google translator.

Edited by DenUA
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One way to do it is increasing the throttle slowly, not go to max power instantly. You add throttle slowly and can correct the plane's direction more easily with rudder and once the plane starts to pick up speed, it will become a lot more stable on the direction where it is going, so only need small rudder adjustments.

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High performance tail-draggers (such as the 109) are known to be a handful on take-off. It sounds like you are overcorrecting which is a common problem. What you need to do is make smaller corrections earlier.

 

What I found really helpful when learning this was to "dance" on the rudders. As I understand it this is how they teach people to fly taildraggers in real life. The idea is that you rapidly alternate between left and right rudder: left-right-left-right-left-right several times a second. When you want to go straight you make modest left and right inputs, if you want to go more left you make a bigger push on the left side, but you still keep the rhythm going. Similarly if you want to go right you just make your right pushes bigger than your left pushes.

 

Hope that helps, and if you're still struggling feel free to post a video and I'm happy to give more feedback.

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High performance tail-draggers (such as the 109) are known to be a handful on take-off. It sounds like you are overcorrecting which is a common problem. What you need to do is make smaller corrections earlier.

 

What I found really helpful when learning this was to "dance" on the rudders. As I understand it this is how they teach people to fly taildraggers in real life. The idea is that you rapidly alternate between left and right rudder: left-right-left-right-left-right several times a second. When you want to go straight you make modest left and right inputs, if you want to go more left you make a bigger push on the left side, but you still keep the rhythm going. Similarly if you want to go right you just make your right pushes bigger than your left pushes.

 

Hope that helps, and if you're still struggling feel free to post a video and I'm happy to give more feedback.

 

Thanks! Will try. I think that I am overcorrecting, even that my pedals aren't set on that sensitive at the start of axis. This fast sequence input will probably help.. Imagining doing that already with my legs. 

 

Thanks to all others too who replied!

S!

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Hi!

 

I have huge problem to keep plane straight during the take-off. When I correct it with rudder to the right, it goes too right then I try to do same to left, then back to right.. and so on.

 

Should I change some settings on my pedals? 

Hello

 

The key to taking off successfully in the 109's is using small increments of throttle to start

 

- Make sure you are aligned correctly on the runway with lots of runway for the takeoff  (taxi back to the start of the runway)

 

- Make sure you are taking off into the wind... the yellow facing side of the runway boards should be facing you

 

- Don't use flaps

 

- Throttle to zero, Prop pitch to manual, prop pitch setting to 100%

 

- 25% throttle to get rolling initially, make sure you are tracking straight and true before adding throttle

 

- Add throttle in small increments, very smoothly

 

- Make any rudder corrections very smoothly

 

- Only add 100% throttle after you are running straight and true

 

- Don't use WEP power unless you are carrying bombs

 

- Allow the aircraft to fly itself into the air... don't yank the stick back

 

- Don't climb steeply until after you have raised your undercarriage

 

The 109 was a very difficult aircraft to take off or land in... because of the mounting of the wheels in the fuselage, the wheels were very close together and the tires were cambered where they contacted the ground... this meant if more weight was on one wheel instead of another, the wheel would dig in, and the aircraft would then change direction.

 

More inexperienced pilots were killed or injured taking off or landing in 109's than any other type.  1/3 of all 109's were damaged in landing accidents. The attrition was particularly bad in the later stages of the war when rookie pilots had very little flight time in training aircraft due to the lack of fuel.

 

The 109's undercarriage was also not very sturdy.  (although the 109G's and later had heavier components)

 

The FW190 was an easier aircraft to land and take off in because its undercarriage was widely set and heavily built.  Even though the 190 had a higher landing speed and a higher stall speed, the sturdiness and stability of the aircraft in the landing and takeoff roll was such it was much simpler to fly.

Edited by Buzzsaw
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Hello

 

The key to taking off successfully in the 109's is using small increments of throttle to start

 

- Make sure you are aligned correctly on the runway with lots of runway for the takeoff (taxi back to the start of the runway)

 

- Make sure you are taking off into the wind... the yellow facing side of the runway boards should be facing you

 

- Don't use flaps

 

- Throttle to zero, Prop pitch to manual, prop pitch setting to 100%

 

- 25% throttle to get rolling initially, make sure you are tracking straight and true before adding throttle

 

- Add throttle in small increments, very smoothly

 

- Make any rudder corrections very smoothly

 

- Only add 100% throttle after you are running straight and true

 

- Don't use WEP power unless you are carrying bombs

 

- Allow the aircraft to fly itself into the air... don't yank the stick back

 

- Don't climb steeply until after you have raised your undercarriage

 

The 109 was a very difficult aircraft to take off or land in... because of the mounting of the wheels in the fuselage, the wheels were very close together and the tires were cambered where they contacted the ground... this meant if more weight was on one wheel instead of another, the wheel would dig in, and the aircraft would then change direction.

 

More inexperienced pilots were killed or injured taking off or landing in 109's than any other type. 1/3 of all 109's were damaged in landing accidents. The attrition was particularly bad in the later stages of the war when rookie pilots had very little flight time in training aircraft due to the lack of fuel.

 

The 109's undercarriage was also not very sturdy. (although the 109G's and later had heavier components)

 

The FW190 was an easier aircraft to land and take off in because its undercarriage was widely set and heavily built. Even though the 190 had a higher landing speed and a higher stall speed, the sturdiness and stability of the aircraft in the landing and takeoff roll was such it was much simpler to fly.

It's easy (have hundreds of take offs) - just go full throttle and counter with rudder. I real live it was more challenging - from what I read/heard.
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Hello

 

The key to taking off successfully in the 109's is using small increments of throttle to start

 

- Make sure you are aligned correctly on the runway with lots of runway for the takeoff  (taxi back to the start of the runway)

 

- Make sure you are taking off into the wind... the yellow facing side of the runway boards should be facing you

 

- Don't use flaps

 

- Throttle to zero, Prop pitch to manual, prop pitch setting to 100%

 

- 25% throttle to get rolling initially, make sure you are tracking straight and true before adding throttle

 

- Add throttle in small increments, very smoothly

 

- Make any rudder corrections very smoothly

 

- Only add 100% throttle after you are running straight and true

 

- Don't use WEP power unless you are carrying bombs

 

- Allow the aircraft to fly itself into the air... don't yank the stick back

 

- Don't climb steeply until after you have raised your undercarriage

 

The 109 was a very difficult aircraft to take off or land in... because of the mounting of the wheels in the fuselage, the wheels were very close together and the tires were cambered where they contacted the ground... this meant if more weight was on one wheel instead of another, the wheel would dig in, and the aircraft would then change direction.

 

More inexperienced pilots were killed or injured taking off or landing in 109's than any other type.  1/3 of all 109's were damaged in landing accidents. The attrition was particularly bad in the later stages of the war when rookie pilots had very little flight time in training aircraft due to the lack of fuel.

 

The 109's undercarriage was also not very sturdy.  (although the 109G's and later had heavier components)

 

The FW190 was an easier aircraft to land and take off in because its undercarriage was widely set and heavily built.  Even though the 190 had a higher landing speed and a higher stall speed, the sturdiness and stability of the aircraft in the landing and takeoff roll was such it was much simpler to fly.

how much elevator trim during takeoff?

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Seems like adding throttle step by step works for me better than full throttle. Don't even use runway anymore :)

 

Glad to know that worked out for you :-) I personally am fairly liberal with the throttle so when you get the hang of the rudder, you definitely don't have to worry as much. Additionally the "dancing on the pedals" stuff will be helpful on landing, whereas without it it's super easy to end up in a ground loop. Glad you're having fun in any case :)

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To the OP, I don't use curves but I do have pedals and a joystick extension. I find I stand pretty hard in the left pedal during runup and relax it as the airflow over the tail increases. I do a very light dance on the pedals. Also, make sure your tailwheel is locked. It makes a world of difference. Full up elevator deflection til 80-90 kph will keep the tailwheel planted better as well.

 

Stay ahead of the nose swing as you accelerate. If it's more than a few degrees from center you can put yourself into a harmonic and make it way more difficult. It is way more pronounced with unlocked/unlockable tailwheel s however.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Stab and Jab the rudder..

Dont try to hold it perfectly straight.

just like many real tail draggers you will only end up chasing your oscilations.
forget about them just stab and jab and keep 109 within 10* of heading to keep gear unloaded.

Here this is very helpful
Timecode 06:00 incase it did not link properly.
https://youtu.be/hRQJuSbcwSA?t=6m5s

Edited by =R4T=Sshadow14
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To the OP, I don't use curves but I do have pedals and a joystick extension. I find I stand pretty hard in the left pedal during runup and relax it as the airflow over the tail increases. I do a very light dance on the pedals. Also, make sure your tailwheel is locked. It makes a world of difference. Full up elevator deflection til 80-90 kph will keep the tailwheel planted better as well.

 

Stay ahead of the nose swing as you accelerate. If it's more than a few degrees from center you can put yourself into a harmonic and make it way more difficult. It is way more pronounced with unlocked/unlockable tailwheel s however.

 

Well I was talking about unlock-able 109 tail wheel :) 

 

Tnx to everyone for replies. Let's all wait TF 5.0 patch and be exited about it :)

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