Jump to content

What exactly doe Dynamic Resolution Factor in the Graphics options ?


Recommended Posts

I let the slider all the way right ( max ) and I do not see an impact in fps, and the graphics look great, but, what exactly does it stand for ?

 

Ok, found it :-)

 

"5. New graphics option 'Dynamic resolution factor' added. It adjusts the render resolution and the number of particles in certain effects on the fly to maintain the FPS level chosen in 'Target FPS' field (or screen refresh rate if the V-Sync option is checked). In VR, the target FPS is always 90;"

Edited by Test-Pilot
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

it lowers your resolution in order to maintain FPS, I find it quite useful.

 

 

If you're getting 60 fps (and have the game locked on it) when flying alone, but suffer when lots of stuff is going on around you, you can use DRF to help you maintain performance without having to sacrifice general quality all around.

 

The game will decrease resolution, and things will get "blurry" around you, and in doing so, your FPS will increase.   

 

The slider can be adjusted between .5 and 1.  This sets a hard limit to how far it can reduce your resolution to preserve your target FPS.    at 50% (minimum setting) it will go as far as half your resolution, which can give you a pretty significant boost in performance.

 

 

 

This is a fantastically useful thing to have.   Most FPS drops occur in brief "spikes", most often at the most important moment whenever something explodes right in front of you.   At that point, any stutters can easily result in a fiery crater full of you and your plane.  

 

DRF smooths out these momentary drops, making them "blurry bouts" rather than "stutter spikes"  

 

Blurry vision for a few seconds is unlikely to end in violent Doom™ - But the same cannot be said of the effects of a sudden loss of all sense of motion.

 

 

I use .5 DRF with a target 60fps.  On my system, it usually holds up full res. 90% of the time.  whenever it blurs out, I'm thoroughly glad it did so, instead of lagging up.

 

 

 

leaving it at maximum (1) is the same as disabling this functionality altogether.  With your resolution limited to never dropping below 100%, any rendering load spikes will result in a momentary FPS loss, as usual.  unless you got yourself a good system and/or reasonable settings

Edited by 19//Moach
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

After they added this setting the microstutters I was having every few minutes, or seconds if things got heavy, went away. Its incredibly useful and I dont notice it if I'm focused on my target too often. Of course I dont crank it up all the way and only let it go down a little bit but its exactly what I needed. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It only drops as far as it has to in order to hold your target FPS, so there's not much to lose from lowering it all the way down to .5

 

 

As far as I'd reason, if there is any situation where my game isn't able to hold steady frames at 75% resolution, I'd rather it drops further than have it grow choppy and unsmooth...

 

 

 

If resolution isn't normalized after any moments of excess load have passed, then one's graphics settings should be adjusted instead.   

 

 

I don't see any reason why I'd sacrifice performance for sharper graphics during a momentary lag-spike.    As long as it holds full res in normal conditions, It can drop as low as it may go if it helps prevent a stutter.

 

But then again, I am running at 60fps... Thus, I'm unwilling to let it slow down even a slight bit from that.    If I had a smoother running system, well above 60, then it may prove worthwhile to trade some extra frames for a sharper game.   I guess it all depends on how it's running for you.

Edited by 19//Moach
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to go look, because I didn't know what you guys were talking about. Mine is set on Full and I can't adjust it. Probably why I didn't know about it. I have my fps limit set to off and that's probably why it's set to Full and unadjustable.

Edited by BuzzU
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've left it at 1/FULL while in VR, mostly because it conflicts with the 90fps requirement for VR.

 

You can use it if you get 90fps about 99% of the time (which suffice to say is very difficult to achieve in VR given the ton of game load variables). However if your VR varies between 45 and 90 this setting (i.e. anything less than 1/FULL) will reduce the resolution pretty much permanently.

Edited by peachmonkey
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not sure which way it is. If its full does it reduce more, or less, or not at all the resolution? Moach explained it well im sure, but my english is so poor that im not sure how it works.

Edited by VesseL
Link to post
Share on other sites

if it's Full it doesn't reduce anything.

 

If it's 0 then it's free to reduce it whenever it wants.

 

It's not exactly intuitive, that's for sure.

 

I am not sure which way it is. If its full does it reduce more, or less, or not at all the resolution? Moach explained it well im sure, but my english is so poor that im not sure how it works.

Edited by peachmonkey
  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My understanding (so far):

Set target fps to x = DRF kicks in if fps drop below target fps and reduces resolution by the modificator you set it at. (to be ble to reach target fps again)

For example you set target fps to 60 fps and DRF to 0.5. DRF will reduce resolution (up?) to 50% if fps drop to 59fps or lower.

 

The lower your DRF is set the lower the resolution will be if it kicks in.

 

I would love to be corrected if my understanding is wrong.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes peachmonkey and Bommel, that is what i thought Moach meant. Before i did read this thread, i thought there were 2 measure, more and less reduced resolution. And i was not sure which one was more reduction :). It could be just on/off switch, i guess. thanks all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...