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216th_Nocke

A5 cylinder head temperature

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Today, I took the A5 for the first time.

I was taking care for oil temperature not to exceed 80 degrees - after like 15 minutes my engine stopped.

Then I switched on the techno chat again - and overheating message appeared at as little as 55 or 60 degrees for oil.

I was unable to find a gauge for the cylinder head temperature, but I assume it must have been too high.

 

So my question: Is there a way to fligh this thing without techno chat on, and still be safe about temperatures?

 

Thx for any hint!

 

Apart from that it was a great show (in the second intent, that is...): Diving down on the russian position at 700km/h, dropping those 500kg on a T34, killing it in the process, and then running away from some russian plane at 1.65 ATA. All felt good.

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We've been very successful without looking for a temp gauge.

The German birds do a pretty good job regulating themselves, I just put the gills at 1/4 open and mind my ATA.

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The only temperature gauge in the 190's cockpit is for the intake oil temperature.

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Thx for answering, guys. Looks like I will just have to open the cooler "a little" - and then hope for the best. Seems a little weird, though. Hard to imagine it was like that, in reality, somehow...

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Guest deleted@30725

The real pilots did have months of training - I guess that probably helped.

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The A5 is not exactly the polished model of FW. Its just a modded A3 which had automatic rads. Open the cowl flaps and if it has an oil rad, open that too. (I don't own the A5)

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My question is how does the 190 pilot knows the correct temps? They only got the Oil temp gauge to look at, it must somehow correlate with the cylinder head temp. Otherwise it makes no sense to say per the manual what temps are good and what temps are bad if there is no way to find out the correct temps. Any ideas?

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You only regulate by oil temperature. There's no cylinder head temperature gauge in the cockpit. There's also no figure in the manual that needs to be observed. Because in the end, oil was more critical than the cylinder head, and if you maintained the right oil temperatures, it was unlikely that the cylinder head temperatures got problematic.

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What is the right oil temp then and where comes the cylinderhaed temp from in the ingame manual? Is it maybe the same as in most other planes? But this would mean that 80° is nothing near other oil temps maximum and should not be to hot then. Im just curios and whould like to know the real numbers for the real plane. Thx for taking the time if someone has the knowledge abou it.

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60° - recommended

70° - maximum continuous

85° - 15min short time maximum

 

It's the temperature of the oil going into the engine after having been cooled, many other temperatures you read are for oil exiting the engine, before being cooled.

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60° - recommended

70° - maximum continuous

85° - 15min short time maximum

 

It's the temperature of the oil going into the engine after having been cooled, many other temperatures you read are for oil exiting the engine, before being cooled.

Ah ok, now it is clear to me, thank you for the info. :)

 

Wierd that instead of your data we have cylinderhead temp which isnt readable.

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The 801 has forced cooling from the radiatorwheel infront of the engine, to maintain optimal c-head temps no matter what situation, so there was no need for a gauge nor knowing c-head temps at all.

 

And as far as i know from the beginning to the A5 the outlet was fixed on forced cooling aswell.

 

They added the adjustable outlet cowlings from the A5 onwards, to give the pilot more percision over controlling the temps in highspeed flight, where the earlier forced cooling was too high and gave away some performance for nothing.

Edited by [TWB]Jizzo

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As Jizzo has stated the A5 relied on forced cooling from the finned wheel mounted behind the prop.

As with all air cooled engines there is very little if any oil around the barrels or cylinder heads (possibly an oil feed to valves/rocker arms etc)

80 degrees is about right for oil temps, and it makes sense that its the oil inlet temp that is monitored.

Oil operates best at a given temp band, to cold and the engine itself will be to cold, the oil will be to viscous and any excessive loading will cause mechanical damage,

to hot and the oil loses its ability to offer the crank, main bearings, piston rings etc proper lubrication.

One thing i've always found odd, especially on the winter maps, is an overcooled engine should suffer mechanical failure in the same manner as an overheated one,

but this doesn't seem to be the case as you can fly around all day with rads fully open and the oil and coolant at 20 degrees without any issues.

Also full throttle take off's with a cold engine should result in failure as well.

This should apply to ALL engines, and they should all fail in a similar manner,

After all, an engine is an engine!

I would love to know exactly what the parameters are for each one.

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The only indication that the cylinder head is overheating is the revs start to become unstable (rev gauge will start bouncing up and down) once the revs start to become unstable u have about 15-30 secs to open the cowl shutters before engine fails and u left gliding.

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Fw-190 and its BMW 801D has a hydralical / mechanical control system (Kommandogerät) which control automatically a engine rpm, a fuel mixture, a ignition time, a supercharger and a boost pressure. A pilots used only the throttle levers and the kommandogerät control all other things in the engine. That's why the Fw-190 was first plane which the pilot's has HOTAS system. 

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