Jump to content
Jason_Williams

Need Help with Pilot Biographies

Recommended Posts

I am currently working on a german one (after i saw your great work for the britsh texts). But i need a little bit more time to tweak it :)

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm working on some too.  I probably sound like a broken record in this thread, but how long do we have?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Big_Al_the_Allo said:

I am currently working on a german one (after i saw your great work for the britsh texts). But i need a little bit more time to tweak it :)

 

Thanks for the compliment, glad I could help inspire you to do some writing. 😎

 

2 hours ago, Feathered_IV said:

I'm working on some too.  I probably sound like a broken record in this thread, but how long do we have?

 

I don’t know, until they are done I suppose. I don’t think they are ready to release the final product this week so there is plenty of time. I have found some good reference material for German pilot training in 1939 - 41 so I should have a Luftwaffe Glider Pilot bio done by the end of the day today.

 

Feathered, you have great creative writing skills, I would just suggest you put them into the format Jason has asked for, and I am sure they will make the cut. 😉

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

guys...you do know that the start date for the career is the second half of '44, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Jade_Monkey said:

Sorry writing is not my strength, thanks for the contributions everyone!

 

I'm sure you can do it as well as any of us... You write briefings for your scripted campaigns don't you? Give it a shot and just think of it as a briefing for a campaign you haven't started yet. 😀

 

22 minutes ago, Sharpe43 said:

guys...you do know that the start date for the career is the second half of '44, right?

 

So far most of the Bios posted have an open start date due to injury, R&R leave, previous postings, etc. so yes,  I do realize the time frame of BoBP and it would appear the others do as well.

 

If you are referring to my comments about training in '39 through '41 above there was a big difference in how the flight schools were organized during those years and it was even more different in '43. with shortages in fuel and aircraft, not to mention getting bombed and shot down while trying to practice flying. 

 

You are aware that RAF pilots weren't trained in England after 1941 right? I'm also thinking a German pilot who flew a biplane in the Spanish Civil War won't be starting a career as a Hauptmann in 1944. This is why I mentioned that the German ones would be harder.

 

Feel free to give it a shot, the more the merrier! 

 

 

Edited by Jaegermeister
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Jaegermeister said:

 

I'm sure you can do it as well as any of us... You write briefings for your scripted campaigns don't you? Give it a shot and just think of it as a briefing for a campaign you haven't started yet. 😀

 

 

So far most of the Bios posted have an open start date due to injury, R&R leave, previous postings, etc. so yes,  I do realize the time frame of BoBP and it would appear the others do as well.

 

If you are referring to my comments about training in '39 through '41 above there was a big difference in how the flight schools were organized during those years and it was even more different in '43. with shortages in fuel and aircraft, not to mention getting bombed and shot down while trying to practice flying. 

 

You are aware that RAF pilots weren't trained in England after 1941 right? I'm also thinking a German pilot who flew a biplane in the Spanish Civil War won't be starting a career as a Hauptmann in 1944. This is why I mentioned that the German ones would be harder.

 

Feel free to give it a shot, the more the merrier! 

 

 

In my bios I've tried to have a variety of experience levels from guys with some combat experience to some who are rookies finally cutting their teeth. I just find if we have the bios starting their training/careers earlier it gives us a bit more range for interesting backstories. Especially since people can choose ranks and ages. So having every bio be a rookie pilot with no flight experience would be a bit of a reach, especially if people are starting as squad leaders at the age of 35 or something. Maybe pre-war you have wing commanders with no combat experience, but by 1944 they'd be pretty thin on the ground. Anyway, I'm having fun just doing it, it would be awesome if one of them made it into the game but we got a lot of talent in this thread so I'm not holding out too much hope lol!
 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kestrel, you don't know until you try..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jaegermeister said:

I'm sure you can do it as well as any of us... You write briefings for your scripted campaigns don't you? Give it a shot and just think of it as a briefing for a campaign you haven't started yet. 😀

 

I just finished writing briefings for 17 missions for a new campaign, im out of creative juices.🥴

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Here is my attempt at a German Bio ...

 

=================================

Glider Pilot ~ Luftwaffe pilot biography

=================================

 

In the small town of Zobten in lower Selesia, Headmaster $[lastName] proudly held up his third son, $[firstName] who had just been born on $[birthdate]. He would follow in his two older brothers’ footsteps and attend the small one room Catholic School where Headmaster $[lastName] taught. As young $[firstName] reached the age of eleven, he joined the local Jungvolk troop while in school, as was the custom now that the National Socialist German Workers’ Party had taken control of the government. It was a peaceful and simple life in the rural countryside, and $[firstName] spent many pleasurable hours hiking, camping and paddling on the river Bober with his friends in the Jungvolk Troop.

 

At the age of fourteen, $[name] joined the Flieger-Hitlerjugend where young schoolboys were taught to fly gliders by the National Socialist Flying Corps. He did well during the A course and thanks to his experience leading the Jungvolk troop as a Fähnleinführer, he was put in charge of the group of students. He was one of the first to pass the final flight test on the SG-38 training glider and receive his A-rating certificate.

 

The $[lastName] family moved from Zobten to Hermannsdorf, where Headmaster $[lastName] had taken a new position at the Catholic school there. There was news of Germany invading the Soviet Union on the radio, but those political problems seemed far away at the time. $[firstName] now had to bicycle 15 kilometers to Bunzlau to take glider courses on the weekends and achieved his B-rating certificate. He completed the course by the time the thermometer dropped to -15 degrees C and snow covered the ground. $[firstName] spent the winter attending school in Löwenberg, which required skiing there and back each day. It was a healthy lifestyle but did not leave much time for anything else.

 

$[firstName] took the C-rating Glider course the next summer, but it required staying in Glogau on the River Oder some 70 kilometers away. This course utilized the enclosed cockpit Grunau Baby II aircraft, and was completed successfully before school resumed again in the fall. With a full set of 3 gull wings on his glider certification badge, $[firstName] applied to become a volunteer officer candidate in the Luftwaffe. He was ordered to report to the reception center in Berlin for testing and medical examination.

 

After the duty NCO confirmed that he had been accepted as a pilot candidate, the recruits were given room assignments, but that night was spent in the air raid shelter when the sirens went off signaling an RAF bomber raid. Upon completion of the medical exam at the Charité Hospital the next day, $[firstName] returned home to await call-up papers. When the notification arrived that he was assigned to the 4th Company of Air Training Regiment 33 at Detmold, he presented the papers to the authorities at his school in Löwenberg, and was given his Notabitur certificate of early completion from Gymnasium for military service.

 

The Air Training Regiment at Detmold provided a 3-month basic training course. All their needs were provided for, with the exception of sufficient food. The rations available were never enough and hunger was a constant companion. The difficulties of physical training, parade marching and infantry weapons practice were endured and the next assignment was the 2nd Volunteer Officer Candidates’ Company of Luftkreigschule 3 in the town of Werder. There the candidates were given basic flight instruction in the Heinkel He 72 Kadett biplane and various other obsolete types. The training syllabus stated that transport planes would be included, but none were available to fly. The course ended with conversion onto the Arado AR 96 advanced trainer. The cadets were required to fly 125 hours to be issued a military pilot’s license, but the instructors were certifying the students at 90 hours due to pressure from their superiors to get more pilots into combat units.

 

After completion of the course at Werder, the next assignment was 1 Staffel of Jagdfleigerschule 1 at Werneuchen, just north-east of Berlin. This was where the new pilots learned to fly the Me 109 fighter. They practiced the intricacies of piloting the F and G models and learned how to master the engine torque and narrow landing gear that was a weakness of all the 109 models. It was difficult to get in flight time at Werneuchen, due to frequent air raids and fuel shortages. Almost half his time in the advanced training school was spent waiting for the planes to be deemed serviceable. There were accidents and mishaps, but $[name] made it through unscathed and his pilot’s license was updated to certify him on all models of the Me 109 at the age of $[age]. $[startRank] $[lastName] was declared operational on $[startDate] and ordered to report to $[startSquadronName] for combat duty.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Jaegermeister

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

=====================================
ROYAL AIR FORCE BIOGRAPHY
- The Family Man
====================================

 

From:
Reverend J.H. Goodman
To: $[startRank] $[name]
$[startSquadronName] RAF

 

My Dear Sir,

 

I hope this letter will find you well, and I hope you will excuse me for writing to you without introduction.  Indeed, I hope this letter reaches you at all.  As I confess I have already written to you twice before.  However on each occasion my letters have come back, your whereabouts unknown. 

 

In my endeavours to speak with you I also journeyed by train and called upon you at your aerodrome. However upon enquiring at the gates, I was told you were no longer there.  At some length I was introduced to the squadron Adjutant who took pity upon an old man.  In some confidence he informed me that you had recently volunteered for a 2nd tour of operations, and were now stationed overseas.  It is to my lasting gratitude that the Adjutant offered that if I were to write again, he would forward the letter personally and ensure that it reached you safely.

 

Perhaps it is fitting that I should introduce myself now.  For although I am a stranger to you and your family, you have been very much on my mind these last weeks.

 

My name is Goodman.  It is a name which I realise is somewhat anachronistic for a man of my 'profession'.  As minister here at St Nichols Church in Chiswick I have guided my flock in matters spiritual since 1922.  While in the additional and more recent role of  District Air Raid Warden for the ARP, I have guarded them against dangers of a more, shall we say, continental nature since June of 1940.  I have held this post throughout the Blitz and beyond.  Through the buzz-bomb attacks of the summer, and on to this newer, more sinister menace presented by the V-2's. 

 

Indeed, it is in the dual role of member of the clergy and as volunteer to the ARP that I feel compelled to write to you now.  That by doing so I hope I may help put your mind at rest.  For I was among the very first to arrive upon the scene after the rocket bomb landed in Sutton Court Road.  And I wanted to give you my most solemn assurance as an eye witness, of that which I am sure, many must have told you already.

 

Your wife and daughter; they couldn’t possibly have known anything about it.  Of that you can be certain and I give you my sincerest word.  They could not have suffered. 

 

When these new weapons come to earth, there is no warning.  They arrive in silence.  It is so swift.  There is no time for alarms.  Nor is there time to be afraid.  They could not have felt any pain. When the moment of tragedy arrived, they were gone from this world in an instant. 

 

Since the war began I have been witness to much anguish and destruction, and I understand how uncaring our fates can sometimes seem. To be wholly delivered from pain; it is a blessing that very few are afforded. 

 

I do not know where your new posting has taken you, nor the odds that you will face.  However I do hope that as this war draws to its close that you will be able to continue on and to take solace, however slight, from this small mercy.

 

My heart goes out to you for the loss of your family and I assure you once again, they could not have suffered.  They are together and they are at peace.  It is I hope, in some small way, a comfort.

 

I wish you well, and I pray that you too may one day find peace.  As indeed, may we all.

 

Yours faithfully,
Rev. James Henry Goodman
CE/Dist. Warden (Volunteer) ARP

Edited by Feathered_IV
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoa Feathered!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Feathered_IV said:

Thanks Sharpe.  It makes me wonder if V-weapon sites will be among the list of ground targets in the new career mode?

 

 

 

Depends on how and what of The Hague can be reached on the map. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to start collecting these and see where we're at. If you are currently still writing please continue. Need more purely British/English ones. 

 

Feathered - I can't use yours. Completely wrong format. See OP for instructions. Please don't do a bunch of work for nothing.

 

Jason

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jason_Williams said:

 

Feathered - I can't use yours. Completely wrong format. See OP for instructions. Please don't do a bunch of work for nothing.

 

Thats okay.  I knew I was pushing it.  Having thought of them though, I just needed to get them out of my system.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep in mind they need to be universal, accounting for both an experienced pilot, and a replacement. Thus certain types details need to be vague or omitted altogether.

Makes it a bit of a challenge but can be done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working on it. :)

 

Thinking on this...If you’re careful (and I don’t pretend to have enough knowledge for the Brit side) you can elude to some previous combat, easier with Brits as any pilot could conceivably have been in the Battle of Britain. Not sure if the transferred around much.

 

It’s tricky with the U.S. end of things, as I can’t rely on the “when transferred” tact that I see in the German bios for instance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will see if I can put out another British one soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Gambit21 said:

you can elude to some previous combat, easier with Brits as any pilot could conceivably have been in the Battle of Britain. Not sure if the transferred around much.

 

From the internet;

 

"In World War II, Royal Air Force doctors had started to notice symptoms of battle fatigue in their pilots. Before 1942, there was no official limit for an operational tour. Some pilots had been flying over 200 missions with only a short break. Then the Senior Medical Officer of the RAF station Biggin Hill intervened, after asking one flight sergeant how many missions he had done and was surprised to hear 200 over 2 years. A tour system was then adopted, the length of it varied, depending on period, theatre, and Command requirements of the time. In (Western Europe), it was set at 200 hours operational flying. In 1944 in South East Asia, the day fighter pilot's tour was 300 hours or 12 months. In Bomber Command, the tour length was exceptionally based on the number of successful combat sorties (missions), the first tour was 30 sorties and the second 20 sorties. In Coastal Command, the maximum length of a tour depended on tasks and varied from fighter to squadrons, normally 200 hours for flying boats and four-engine land-plane crews’ 800 hours.

The tour of duty for B-52 crewmen is four to six months."

 

Career pilots would have stayed operational for the duration, but possibly been transferred to training or other units if not promoted to command positions. 

Edited by Jaegermeister

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Here's a British biography. I'm really revealing my Canadian bias here with yet another BCATP participant but hey, thousands of RAF pilots were trained in the Dominion so I feel justified.

The East Side Lad


For "the Few", the brave RAF pilots that fought in the Battle of Britain, the fall of 1940 represented a gradual easing of the intense conflict that had been their baptism of fire. The Luftwaffe had been seen off and the once-daily daytime bombing raids had slowed to a trickle.

For the people of London, the raids of 1940 were only the beginning.

$[name] grew up as poor as a church mouse on London's East Side, and had never been outside the city when the first bombs fell on his neighbourhood. The war had been on everyone's lips for a long time but it had all seemed so far away to the young man. Within a matter of months he had gone from the standard privations of poverty to the additional intense terror of the night-time bombing raids. Insufficient shelter space near the home he lived in with his parents and two sisters meant they took refuge where they could, sometimes in the tube stations, packed cheek-by-jowl with thousands of other anxious Londoners.

The Blitz left his neighbourhood devastated. Destroyed buildings spilled rubble onto the road, the rows of tenements like a snaggle-toothed boxer's smile. Terror quickly turned to rage and frustration as he cowered helplessly under the relentless night-time bombing of the Luftwaffe, with the vaunted RAF apparently unable to effectively stop it. His old haunts were cratered, burned or simply showered with shell fragments from the thousands of flak shells bursting high above in the night. $[firstName] had never been a patriot in the strictest sense, but the attacks on his home and the deaths of those he knew and loved were enough to light a fire inside him. At his earliest opportunity, he enlisted in the RAF, hoping in some way to strike back at those that had shattered his home city.

$[firstName] was as surprised as anyone when he was selected to be a pilot, and he was even more surprised when he was almost immediately shipped to Canada for training. The Atlantic crossing was brutal and the seasickness alone nearly killed him - on many days, he wished it had! Arriving in Halifax, he was unprepared for the sheer scale of the country he found himself in, as he was bundled onto a train with dozens of others destined for points farther west, spending hours moving through the vast countryside. $[name] got his first taste of wilderness staring out the windows of the train at the huge forests and field that stretched at times to the horizon. Towns were hours or even days apart by train, when he had previously considered the far side of London to be a bit of a trek!

With his horizons suitably broadened, he found himself besieged by a month of theory on flight, navigation and other necessities in Regina, Saskatchewan. $[firstName] struggled, but with the help of other students and some thoughtful instructors, he found he had a knack for maths that served him well, though he knew he would never love academic pursuits. After the oppressive theory training came his first flights in a Tiger Moth high above the prairies in Prince Albert. If the world had seemed large before, now it seemed endless. The horizon was no limit at all, and as soon as he landed he wanted to go up again.

The intensive training program continued and he found himself piloting progressively faster and faster craft, but he was tired of training and itching to get to the fight. He grew to fear that the war would be over before he got there. Finally, he completed operational training in Quebec and was shipped back home. A mere week of leave was all that was allowed for him to reconnect with his friends and family in  London  before he was sent to his first combat posting as a $[startRank] on the continent.

At the age of $[age], $[name] set foot on the European continent for the first time and moved as quickly as the strained Allied logistics would allow to his front-line squadron. Within days, he would face the Hun in the skies over Northwest Europe, and finally get a chance to strike back at the foe that had mauled his home city so badly. Would he be up to the task?
 

Edited by RedKestrel
fixed some repetitive phrasing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Jaegermeister said:

 

From the internet;

 

"In World War II, Royal Air Force doctors had started to notice symptoms of battle fatigue in their pilots. Before 1942, there was no official limit for an operational tour. Some pilots had been flying over 200 missions with only a short break. Then the Senior Medical Officer of the RAF station Biggin Hill intervened, after asking one flight sergeant how many missions he had done and was surprised to hear 200 over 2 years. A tour system was then adopted, the length of it varied, depending on period, theatre, and Command requirements of the time. In (Western Europe), it was set at 200 hours operational flying. In 1944 in South East Asia, the day fighter pilot's tour was 300 hours or 12 months. In Bomber Command, the tour length was exceptionally based on the number of successful combat sorties (missions), the first tour was 30 sorties and the second 20 sorties. In Coastal Command, the maximum length of a tour depended on tasks and varied from fighter to squadrons, normally 200 hours for flying boats and four-engine land-plane crews’ 800 hours.

The tour of duty for B-52 crewmen is four to six months."

 

Career pilots would have stayed operational for the duration, but possibly been transferred to training or other units if not promoted to command positions. 

 

Nice - thanks for posting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure thing. I've learned quite a bit about WWII pilot training from this thread. I appreciate the opportunity to share some of what I've found.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again a small update from me concerning the biography. I'm sorry, but I had an extremely busy week, and today I'm just too knackered to write.

But as a rough idea in which direction my story would go the following would be:

- Father who had something to do in flight business
- in the early years before the war a sport pilot
- Test pilot (still open at which company)
- Wounding and subsequent enrolment for the Luftwaffe

I don't know if this career is too hackneyed away, but I hope it stands out far enough from the others to be interesting.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Big_Al_the_Allo said:

Again a small update from me concerning the biography. I'm sorry, but I had an extremely busy week, and today I'm just too knackered to write.

But as a rough idea in which direction my story would go the following would be:

- Father who had something to do in flight business
- in the early years before the war a sport pilot
- Test pilot (still open at which company)
- Wounding and subsequent enrolment for the Luftwaffe

I don't know if this career is too hackneyed away, but I hope it stands out far enough from the others to be interesting.

 

A couple of suggestions then:

1: test pilot at either focke-Wulf or Messerschmidt

2: Wounded in a flying accident means end of the testing career, but not of the flying career, as you are 'welcomed'into Luftwaffe unit that flies aircraft to the frontline Jagdgeschwader. (aka a ferry unit) Let''s say that after a delivery flight in September of 1944, you are 'retained' by the unit commander to which you delivered your assigned aircraft.

 

The Munro/Putz book on Bodenplatte makes mention of ferry pilots being retained to make up the numbers for the Bodenplatte mission on the German side of things. This might be a way to start that kind of a career. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Finally i had the time and productivity to create my first pilot story.  I hope it is usable and i am open for criticism. Special thanks to @JgonRedcorn for having a look over it :) I also put my german original to this, so you don´t need to translate it, if you use it.

=======================================
LUFTWAFFE PILOT BIOGRAPHY
– The Testpilot
=======================================

 

My father Georg $[lastName] was a rising industrialist from Hamburg, and his company flourished. I was born on $[birthdate] .  My father was very often not at home because of his work, but still supported me wherever he could. So it was no problem to pursue my emerging passion for flying.  When I was younger I had a small box with photos of pilots like Udet, Göring, Richthofen, Voss and many others. What would I have given to be born a few years earlier to fly on their side?
Nevertheless I was anxious to make this wish come true.

 

As flying clubs developed over time, I didn't stay away for long. Gliding, I had to admit, was impressive, but I quickly lost interest in them. I wanted to be faster. Not long and I tinkered with my first own biplane, which was provided to me by my father and some sponsors. With my "Marlene" I even competed in some competitions. There was even a newspaper article with the title: "$[name], an ascending star of flying". In the process I met some people and made contacts.  I expected a lot from it, but I also knew that I would soon have to decide on my future career. The choice was hard for me because the newly founded Luftwaffe looked tempting and I had what it took to become a true flying ace.

 

On the other hand, I wanted to experiment and explore new patterns. Finally, I decided to go to the German Aviation Research Institute to become a test pilot.  Shortly afterwards the war broke out over Europe. It was impressive to see in the Wochenschau how our troops victoriously defeated the enemy. Nevertheless, I stuck to my wish and finished my training. Fortunately, I had met Hans Sander, test pilot at Focke-Wulf GmbH in Bremen, in the years before the war. With a few good words from him and the contacts of my father it was possible for me to find a job there as well.


I loved the experimental job! Of course it wasn't completely harmless, but it gave me the opportunity to fly all the latest and best designs myself. Above all the Fw-190, a magnificent machine. I also got the chance to fly some other models like the Fw-189 or the bomber prototype 191. Not all of them were easy, some even dangerous, but that didn't frighten me. In the air I felt one with the machine. However that harmony didn't last forever. The war situation worsened visibly and what was at one time unthinkable finally happened. Allied bombers poured in and bombed us in the Reich. We test pilots were not spared from it, with me it was on a sunny day over Bremen, when I tested a new prototype of the Fw-190.

 

During the test I was at an altitude of over six kilometres to determine her performance. My radio must have been broken because I didn't get a warning about opponents when three allied fighters rushed from the sun. Tracers swept over me, and from pure reflex I tilted the machine away. I frantically tried to see if they were still behind me. Nothing, slowly I started to finish my dive, flew into a cloud and circled there for a moment. Just as I was about to leave it and go back to the airfield everything exploded before my eyes! From one moment to the next my instrument panel was a smoking ruin, the engine ran irregularly and splinters were stuck in my leg and arm. My heart was racing as I dropped the canopy and pulled the leash for my parachute. A jerk went through my aching body and I saw before my eyes a smoking 190 drilling into the ground.


My landing turned out to be unhappy as I broke my left arm. Something had changed. I didn't feel safe anymore, I wanted to take revenge and pay these dogs back. As soon as I was on my feet again I discussed my decision with my father. I hoped he might be able to help me this time as well. He refused... He didn't want me to throw myself into even greater uncertainties. But he couldn't stop me and my desire for retribution came on $[startDate]. With $[age] years, I became part of the Luftwaffe as $[startRank] after all.  Now we'll see who gets shot down here.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mein Vater Georg $[lastName] war ein aufsteigender Industrieller aus Hamburg, und seine Firma florierte regelrecht. Geboren wurde ich am $[birthdate].  Mein Vater war sehr oft nicht zu Hause wegen seiner Arbeit, unterstützte mich dennoch wo er nur konnte. So war es kein Problem meiner aufkommenden Passion der Fliegerei nachzugehen. Als ich noch kleiner war hatte ich eine kleine Kiste mit Fotos von Flieger Assen wie Udet, Göring, Richthofen, Voss und vielen anderen. Was hätte ich nur gegeben einige Jahre früher geboren zu sein um an ihrer Seite zu fliegen. 

 

Nichts desto trotz war ich bestrebt diesen Wunsch Wirklichkeit werden zu lassen. Als sich mit der Zeit Fliegervereine immer weiter ausbildeten, blieb ich nicht lange fern. Die Segelfliegerei, so musste ich gestehen, war zwar beeindruckend aber ich verlor schnell die Lust an ihr. Ich wollte schneller sein. Nicht lange und ich tüftelte an meinem ersten eigenen Doppeldecker, der mir von meinem Vater sowie einigen Sponsoren gestellt wurde. Mit meiner „Marlene“ bestritt ich sogar einige Wettbewerbe. Es gab sogar mal einen Zeitungsartikel, mit dem Titel: „$[name], ein aufsteigender Stern der Fliegerei.“ Man lernte dabei einige Leute kennen und knüpfte Kontakte. 

 

Ich versprach mir viel davon, und wusste jedoch auch, dass ich bald mich für meinen weiteren Berufsweg entscheiden musste. Die Wahl fiel mir schwer, denn die neugegründete Luftwaffe sah verlockend aus und ich hatte bestimmt das Zeug dazu ein waschechtes Fliegerass zu werden. Aber auf der anderen Seite wollte ich experimentieren und beim Erforschen von neuen Mustern dabei sein. Schlussendlich entschied ich mich für die Deutsche Versuchsanstalt für Luftfahrt, um zum Testpiloten zu werden.  Nur wenig später brach der Krieg über Europa herein. In der Wochenschau zu sehen wie unsere Truppen siegreich den Feind besiegten, war beeindruckend. Nichts desto trotz hielt ich an meinem Wunsch fest und beendete meine Ausbildung. Zu meinem Glück hatte ich in den Jahren vor dem Krieg Hans Sander, Testpilot bei der Focke-Wulf GmbH aus Bremen, kennengelernt. Mit ein paar guten Worten von ihm und den Kontakten meines Vaters war es mir möglich ebenfalls dort eine Anstellung zu finden.

 

Ich liebte die Erprobungsstelle! Natürlich war es auch nicht ganz ungefährlich, aber es bot sich mir die Möglichkeit all die neusten und besten Entwürfe selbst fliegen zu dürfen. Darunter vor allem die Fw-190, eine prachtvolle Maschine. Aber auch einige andere Baumuster wie die Fw-189 oder der Bomberprototyp 191. Nicht alle davon waren einfach, einige sogar gefährlich, aber das erschreckte mich nicht. In der Luft fühlte ich mich eins mit der Maschine.  Aber diese Harmonie blieb nicht für ewig. Die Kriegslage verschlechterte sich zusehends und das was vorher Undenkbar war trat ein.

 

Alliierte Bomber strömten hinein und bombardierten uns im Reich. Auch wir Testflieger wurden nicht davon verschont, bei mir war es an einem sonnigen Tag über Bremen, als ich gerade einen neuen Prototyp der Fw-190 testete. Während des Tests befand ich mich auf über sechs Kilometern Höhe, um ihre Leistung zu ermitteln. Mein Bordfunk musste ausgefallen sein, denn ich erhielt keine Warnung über Gegner als aus der Sonne drei alliierte Jäger stürzten.  Leuchtspur fegte über mich hinweg, und mehr aus Reflex kippte ich die Maschine weg. Panisch versuchte ich zu sehen ob sie noch hinter mir waren.  Nichts, langsam begann ich meinen Sturzflug zu beenden und in eine Wolke zu fliegen und kreiste dort für einen Moment.

 

Gerade als ich sie verließ und mich zurück zum Flugfeld machen wollte explodierte vor meinen Augen alles!  Von einem auf den anderen Moment war mein Armaturenbrett eine rauchende Ruine, der Motor lief unregelmäßig und Splitter steckten in meinem Bein und meinem Arm. Mein Herz raste während ich die Haube abwarf und die Leine für meinen Fallschirm zog. Ein Ruck ging durch meinen schmerzenden Körper und ich sah vor meinen Augen wie eine rauchende 190 sich in den Boden bohrte.  Meine Landung erwies sich als Unglücklich, da ich mir dabei den linken Arm brach.  Etwas hatte sich verändert. Ich fühlte mich nicht mehr sicher, ich wollte mich rächen und es diesen Hunden heimzahlen.

 

Sobald ich wieder einigermaßen auf den Beinen war, besprach ich meine Entscheidung mit meinem Vater, ich hoffte er könnte mir vielleicht auch dieses Mal helfen. Aber er weigerte sich, wollte nicht das ich mich in noch größere Ungewissheiten stürzte. Aber er konnte mich nicht davon abhalten und meinem Wunsch nach Vergeltung wurde am $[startDate]. Mit $[age] jahren bin ich als $[startRank] nun doch Teil der Luftwaffe geworden.  Jetzt werden wir ja sehen wer hier abgeschossen wird.

 

Edited by Big_Al_the_Allo
added more paragraphs for better readability
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like it Al, nice one.  I find your use of "I or we" carries with it a much greater sense of immediacy and does more to put you in the game than monologuing about somebody else in the third-person. 

 

One thing I'd probably suggest for most though is to try and break up the bio into smaller paragraphs where possible, as the game GUI can often make it read as a wall of text. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Feathered_IV said:

I like it Al, nice one.  I find your use of "I or we" carries with it a much greater sense of immediacy and does more to put you in the game than monologuing about somebody else in the third-person. 

 

Well, the problem with that is that these are supposed to biographies, so all this use of "I" and "we" goes entirely against that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all many thanks for the tip, I made a few more paragraphs for the better readability. Personally, I see it the same way with the I and we. I think it's still a biography or a career from a personal perspective, which is much more attractive than this view of an unknown third person. Which is why, for example, I took Feathered_IV's story the Transporter in my career about Stalingrad. Precisely because of this personal view.  Let's see, it can't be more than rejected.

 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2019 at 11:39 AM, Jason_Williams said:

I'm going to start collecting these and see where we're at. If you are currently still writing please continue. Need more purely British/English ones. 

 

Let us know if you have what you need or how many more you might like. I can continue working on it if you don’t have enough British bios.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 7/20/2019 at 5:55 PM, Feathered_IV said:

I like it Al, nice one.  I find your use of "I or we" carries with it a much greater sense of immediacy and does more to put you in the game than monologuing about somebody else in the third-person. 

 

One thing I'd probably suggest for most though is to try and break up the bio into smaller paragraphs where possible, as the game GUI can often make it read as a wall of text. 

 

I don't agree - I think either is effective if well executed.

A well narrated 3rd person account can be very immersive - think "Ken Burns". That's my preference.

 

On the other hand a first person account can work, or come off as cheesy if you'e not careful. There's a "why is the person talking about themselves and to who?" that creeps in, at least to me and actually has a negative effect on the feeling of authenticity. Remember also that these were kids, away from home,  missing their family, if you're writing first person then you'd better capture this. You cant' write as YOU, you need to write as that young kid.

 

 I'm keeping mine 3rd person, and maybe one or two in a "letter home" format, which lends some authenticity, and evades the problem stated above.

I'm up to 10, with one so far a letter home - I think one more. The rest 3rd person.

 

 

 

Edited by Gambit21
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Gambit21 said:

 

I don't agree - I think either is effective if well executed.

A well narrated 3rd person account can be very immersive - think "Ken Burns". That's my preference.

 

On the other hand a first person account can work, or come off as cheesy if you'e not careful. There's a "why is the person talking about themselves and to who?" that creeps in, at least to me and actually has a negative effect on the feeling of authenticity. Remember also that these were kids, away from home,  missing their family, if you're writing first person then you'd better capture this. You cant' write as YOU, you need to write as that young kid.

 

 I'm keeping mine 3rd person, and maybe one or two in a "letter home" format, which lends some authenticity, and evades the problem stated above.

I'm up to 10, with one so far a letter home - I think one more. The rest 3rd person.

 

 

 

I've kept all mine in 3rd person so far and think if I do any more I will continue to do so, just for consistency's sake. What we're into here is kind of halfway between technical writing (where there are a lot of constraints and such) and creative writing. So there's a definite need for formatting consistency (and, to a certain extent, consistency of tone).

I do personally like the 'letter home' style of writing best in longer narratives, as a sort of first-person interlude in the broader story, giving insight into how particular characters write and how they present themselves. Are they guarded? Are they writing their true thoughts? Are they lying, and if so, why? To get past the censors, to assuage their own guilt, to reassure a loved one that all will be well? There's a lot of possible implication that the reader can tease out.

If I can expand upon it a bit, I find that first-person writing is often something that beginning writers go with as it seems easier to get into the character's head. They may find it easier to write in such a way. This is why a lot of first-person writing seems cheesy and immature - its often written by beginner authors who are finding their feet. Later, writers often 'progress' to third person as it is more flexible, and they are learning to juggle characters and plot more. Once they reach a certain level of experience, they often double back into first person narratives, because doing them well is harder than doing a third person story well. A good author can build in self-deception, a completely unique tone, or an unreliable narrator. The possibilities for plot with first-person narratives are often limited but there are things you can do with it that you just can't do with third person stuff.

Its an interesting exercise for the writer, to be sure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah well. Sounds like you’ve got it all sorted.  I’m glad I gave it a shot though.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of good read here. 

Finnishing this tread I feel zi read a book

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Feathered_IV said:

Ah well. Sounds like you’ve got it all sorted.  I’m glad I gave it a shot though.   

I hope you didn't think I was implying the first-person writing was bad. Your writing is very good and a good example of how to use the first-person POV effectively with a unique voice. With some formatting it could maybe fit in with the bios. Just a bit trickier than third-person.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Alright, I have two to contribute so far. I've got a bit of a groove going now so if more are needed I can probably crank a few more out. I've done my best using the books and research materials I have personally or I was able to search for online to make sure that the sprinkling of places, units, and locations are all accurate and reasonably well researched.

 

The Canadian – RAF Pilot Biography (Canadian)

Born to British parents on $[birthdate], $[name] grew up the suburbs of Winnipeg, Manitoba. At a young age, $[firstname] saw his first airplane and immediately fell in love with everything aviation. He cut out stamps, postcards, and newspaper clippings wherever he could find them. $[lastname]’s affinity for flying grew more fervent when he joined the Winnipeg Air Cadets as a teenager. Flying came before everything else including his love of hockey.

 

With the declaration of war and feeling it his duty to do his part for King and Country, $[name] was quickly inducted into the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. He was sent from Winnipeg to Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan for intensive pilot training. He earned his wings flying a Harvard trainer aircraft.

 

With his flight school training complete, $[lastname] traveled aboard the HMS Queen Elizabeth to England and into RAF Fighter Command. There he stayed for only a few months training on Spitfires. It was then that his war truly began. $[lastname] was selected to be part of Operation Bowery. His job was to ferry fighters to the beleaguered island of Malta off of the deck of USS Wasp (CV-7). Malta was in desperate need of both pilots and fighters to defend the island and $[lastname] was to play his part in reinforcing the strategic island nation.

 

$[firstname] completed his tour at Malta scoring no kills of his own, however, he earned the respect of his fellow squadron mates in No 126 Squadron by being a vigilant defender of his flight leader. After his first tour was over, $[lastname] returned to England to help train new pilots, however, his lack of victories drove him to quickly request a posting with an active squadron.

 

With the war continuing into its fifth year, $name, feels the call to once again to fly in defense of Canada, Britain and the rest of the Commonwealth. Posted to $[startSquadronName], $[firstname] is ready once again to take to the skies against the Axis powers and hopefully make a name for himself.

 

 

 

Son of London businessman - RAF Pilot Biography (British)

$[name] was born unexpectedly in Wellington, New Zealand on $[birthdate], as the son of a successful London businessman.

 

His father, owning a series of tailors’ shops around the British capital and looking to expand his business to other countries concluded his business in Wellington before traveling with the family and $[firstname] on the long trip back to England. There they settled into a two-storey flat in the London neighborhood of Bloomsbury.

 

$[firstname] had an uneventful childhood with a firmly upper-middle-class upbringing. His father’s businesses afforded the family some luxuries and the opportunity to enrol into the University of Cambridge in their law school. His athleticism helped earn him a place on the inter-university cricket team while his occasional lack of focus on his studies sometimes earned him the scorn of his professors. Soon that would all be in the past as $[firstname] was mobilised as part of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force on the outbreak of the war.

 

Selected by the RAF, $[lastname]’s abilities as skilled pilot became highly regarded and he was sent to the Instructor's course at the Central Flying School. The first few years of war dragged on as he trained hundreds of pilots to fly and fight in the conflict that was consuming all of Europe.

 

Longing to take a more active role in the war, $[lastname] requested a transfer and was sent to $[startSquadronName] on $[startDate]. The horrors of the air war over Europe would test even bit of $[lastname]’s skills as a pilot.

 

 

 

I can do more if needed!

Edited by ShamrockOneFive
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guys,

 

Ok some good work here. I've pulled many of the ones listed here for use. However, I'm still short about 4 native British biographies. Maybe some lads from London, Birmingham, Manchester, Sheffield, Dover, Brighton etc. I'd write them, but it would be obvious all I know about the UK comes from watching Top Gear.

 

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 7/21/2019 at 11:28 PM, Gambit21 said:

 

 I'm keeping mine 3rd person, and maybe one or two in a "letter home" format, which lends some authenticity, and evades the problem stated above.

I'm up to 10, with one so far a letter home - I think one more. The rest 3rd person.

 

If you need some more material, chapter 6 has 12 pilot bios for 1943 P-38 pilots that could give you some good information 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Jagged-Edge-Duty-Fighter-Pilots/dp/0811718425

 

 

 

Edited by Jaegermeister
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...