Jump to content
InProgress

Ju 87 few questions

Recommended Posts

Hello, i saw tutorial:

but it only shows landing and takeoff, I always break engine when flying or i am too slow and i crash. How should i fly ju87? My question is:

Should i keep water and oil radiators always open when flying?

How much RPM should i keep?

When and what phase of supercharger should i use?

How much throttle won't break my engine?

What is safe water/oil temperature and how to cool it down if it's too high?

 

If i missed something i also should know would be nice to get some more tips :]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Engine Limitations for all JuMo 211 Powered Aircraft ingame are: 

Take-Off: 1.4ata@2600rpm

Climb: 1.3ata@2400rpm

Maximum Cruise: 1.15ata@2200rpm (2400rpm in Ju-88)

 

You can find all Specs on the Spec Page in the Mission Briefing. 

 

 

 

8uxff6m.png

 

 

Edited by 6./ZG26_Klaus__Mann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks,that explains a lot, but one more thing, what is this ata? Can I control it or it's just something that I see on cockpit's instrument and it depends on RPM?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks,that explains a lot, but one more thing, what is this ata? Can I control it or it's just something that I see on cockpit's instrument and it depends on RPM?

 

That is your manifold pressure (engine throttle). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks,that explains a lot, but one more thing, what is this ata? Can I control it or it's just something that I see on cockpit's instrument and it depends on RPM?

Are you aware of the basic workings of an Aircraft Engine? Ata is a Unit for Pressure, with 1.0 being normal Airpressure on the Ground. 

When we say ata, we mean Manifold Pressure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I am not, that's why I am asking and watching tutorials. BoS is my first sim (CoD was but it did not work well so could not play much..)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll try to explain it in simple terms. 


All ingame Aircraft have Supercharged Internal Combustion Engines. 


 


Internal Combustion requires a certain ratio of Fuel, in our Case Aviation Grade Gasoline, and Air. Normally the perfect ratio of Air to Fuel in an ideal engine is 15:1, or 15 Weight Units of Air for one Weight unit of fuel. This can however vary, for example the Choke on a Car or the Primer on an Aircraft can reduce this to 3-5:1 for Startup, as the fuel doesn't fully vaporize at these low temperatures, while at very high temperatures in a hot running Air Cooled engine you can reach Mixtures of up to 25:1, but 15:1 is still the optimum you want. 


 


This means that in order to generate power you have to Mix large amounts of Air with very small amounts of fuel through means of a Carburettor in which the fuel is mixed into the intake Air and vapourizes in it. 


Getting the small amounts of fuel there thus is almost no Challenge, so the quest is for the greatest Amount of Air to maintain roughly a 15:1 Mixture. 


Now a Naturally Aspirated engine is limited to whatever it can suck in at Ground Pressure, which is why you often see Ludicrously Large  Air Intakes on Naturally Aspirated Sports Cars and American V8 Muscle Cars. 


 


This automatically leads us to Manifold Pressure, units are ATA for Germans (ca 1.0 ata at Ground Level), mm in Mercury for Russians (ca. 750mmHg on the Ground) and Inches in Mercury (29.92 InHg on the Ground). 


 


The Airflow in the Intake Manifold is controlled by the Throttle Valve in the Carburettor. At 0% throttle this Valve is almost closed, so the Cylinders can suck in only very small amounts of Air-Fuel Mix, creating low pressure in the intake. This is called "Idle". At Idle the Airpressure inside may be as low as 10% of the surrounding Air, when the throttle is wide open,  the pressure inside the Manifold will almost equalize with the Ouside Pressure. 


 


Now here is the Problem with Naturally Aspirated Engines, especially in Aircraft. In our Atmospehere the Pressure at 5500m is half as much as on the Ground, at 11000m it's 25% and so on, and at the same rate engine power would decrease as well. This means your performance would drop sharply the higher you got, you would really struggle with 5000m and more. 


 


In the end the only solution to get more engine power at higher alitudes then is to get more air into the intake. In WWI some German engines were equipped with a Second Throttle which when opened at 1500m would supply the engine with a bit more air, but this wasn't very effective. 


 


One Option was to pump more of the Surrounding Air into the Engine through means of a Compressor driven by the Engine. This Compressor could Charge more Air into the Manifold, even at high Altitude it could provide the engine with as much Air as it would have on the Ground.


 


So instead of your German Engine having 0.5 ata at 5500m, you still could use 1.0 ata at that altitude, thus providing you with 4 times as much power at that altitude as your Naturally Aspirated Counterpart. 


You could even use that Compressor to Boost you Power at Lower Altitude, since it could deliver much more than Ground Pressure into the intake.


This Compressor is the "Supercharger"


 


This was a huge leap and engine power rose sharply before the War. You were suddenly able to make much smaller, lighter, yet more powerful engines which could cruise higher and farther, since you the drag at high altitude is much lower. 


For Example the Normally Aspirated Wright R-790  could only produce 220hp for take-off, it's later cousin, the Supercharged R-760 despite it's slightly smaller displacement could produce 350hp for take-off and had much better performance at altitude. 


 


All that to get to the simple point of: ATA indicated how much pressure that Supercharger is producing in your intake Manifold. 


RPM are simple "Revolutions per Minute" of the Engine, in other words how many Rotations the Crankshaft makes in a Minute. 


This is regulated by the Propeller blades being adjusted to a finer or coarser angle. I'll put in an Illustration below. 


 


1.4 ata@2600RPM are appopiate for take-off (don't forget to open all radiators fully)


1.3 ata@2400RPM are the appropiate setting for climbing. You can use them for 30 Minutes.


1.15ata@2200RPM are the Maximum Cruise Power you can use for eternity (or until fuel runs out)


 


It's a Two Speed Supercharger, so at 3000m it automatically switches up to 2nd gear, which is the high altitude gear. 


Don't forget to switch down Manually when you dive, or you may Over-Rev your engine. 


Also remember to make only gently movements on the throttle. 


 


The big, snail looking thing is the Supercharger, basically a Big Fan. 


 


db_605.jpg


 


imagesbb.jpg


  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Klaus, that's a really good explanation!  You've really helped my understanding and I'm probably going to bookmark your post for future reference :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Han's Developer Q&A posts today also mentioned that the thermal modelling of the Ju87 engine will be reviewed in the upcoming patch 2.004 so that should help as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmm i have still one noob question... How do i open/close oil/water radiator? I tried to look for this in options but could not find (my game is not in english so maybe it's translated weird way) I just can't find button that opens/closes it. What's default button for this?

 

and thanks for that long answer :)

 

and i must say that i had successful takeoff and even landing (tho i missed airfield :( ) but all the tips helped, only engine was too hot due to closed oil and water radiators.

Edited by InProgress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmm i have still one noob question... How do i open/close oil/water radiator? I tried to look for this in options but could not find (my game is not in english so maybe it's translated weird way) I just can't find button that opens/closes it. What's default button for this?

 

and thanks for that long answer :)

 

and i must say that i had successful takeoff and even landing (tho i missed airfield :( ) but all the tips helped, only engine was too hot due to closed oil and water radiators.

Under engine controls, 14th down is "Switch water radiator controls manual/auto"  You can use this even if your difficulty is on normal, otherwise you cannot adjust the radiator/oil controls.

 

15th - 22nd down starts all the oil/water/air controls.  I bind them all to the same keys.  One for open/close water/outlet rads and one for open/close oil rads with a 3rd binding only for "Engine inlet cowl shutters control (I-16, La5).

 

Stuka should be 19th, 20th down with "Water radiators control shutters control axis" and "Oil radiators control shutters axis"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok the Stuka is just broken. How on earth is 60% trottle take off mode? I go lower, to 55% climb speed, the stuka stalls and crashes, I go higher, to 100% to gain altitude, and the engine fails. I am so annoyed that I am comsidering not playing this sim again. So, how do you take off and fly the stuka without it falling to the ground?

I just crashed 4 times in a row trying to take of. Stalled or engine stoppage about 10 minutes after take off with Oil Radiator fully open. How is 60% take off mode?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'll try to explain it in simple terms. 

All ingame Aircraft have Supercharged Internal Combustion Engines. 

 

Internal Combustion requires a certain ratio of Fuel, in our Case Aviation Grade Gasoline, and Air. Normally the perfect ratio of Air to Fuel in an ideal engine is 15:1, or 15 Weight Units of Air for one Weight unit of fuel. This can however vary, for example the Choke on a Car or the Primer on an Aircraft can reduce this to 3-5:1 for Startup, as the fuel doesn't fully vaporize at these low temperatures, while at very high temperatures in a hot running Air Cooled engine you can reach Mixtures of up to 25:1, but 15:1 is still the optimum you want. 

 

This means that in order to generate power you have to Mix large amounts of Air with very small amounts of fuel through means of a Carburettor in which the fuel is mixed into the intake Air and vapourizes in it. 

Getting the small amounts of fuel there thus is almost no Challenge, so the quest is for the greatest Amount of Air to maintain roughly a 15:1 Mixture. 

Now a Naturally Aspirated engine is limited to whatever it can suck in at Ground Pressure, which is why you often see Ludicrously Large  Air Intakes on Naturally Aspirated Sports Cars and American V8 Muscle Cars. 

 

This automatically leads us to Manifold Pressure, units are ATA for Germans (ca 1.0 ata at Ground Level), mm in Mercury for Russians (ca. 750mmHg on the Ground) and Inches in Mercury (29.92 InHg on the Ground). 

 

The Airflow in the Intake Manifold is controlled by the Throttle Valve in the Carburettor. At 0% throttle this Valve is almost closed, so the Cylinders can suck in only very small amounts of Air-Fuel Mix, creating low pressure in the intake. This is called "Idle". At Idle the Airpressure inside may be as low as 10% of the surrounding Air, when the throttle is wide open,  the pressure inside the Manifold will almost equalize with the Ouside Pressure. 

 

Now here is the Problem with Naturally Aspirated Engines, especially in Aircraft. In our Atmospehere the Pressure at 5500m is half as much as on the Ground, at 11000m it's 25% and so on, and at the same rate engine power would decrease as well. This means your performance would drop sharply the higher you got, you would really struggle with 5000m and more. 

 

In the end the only solution to get more engine power at higher alitudes then is to get more air into the intake. In WWI some German engines were equipped with a Second Throttle which when opened at 1500m would supply the engine with a bit more air, but this wasn't very effective. 

 

One Option was to pump more of the Surrounding Air into the Engine through means of a Compressor driven by the Engine. This Compressor could Charge more Air into the Manifold, even at high Altitude it could provide the engine with as much Air as it would have on the Ground.

 

So instead of your German Engine having 0.5 ata at 5500m, you still could use 1.0 ata at that altitude, thus providing you with 4 times as much power at that altitude as your Naturally Aspirated Counterpart. 

You could even use that Compressor to Boost you Power at Lower Altitude, since it could deliver much more than Ground Pressure into the intake.

This Compressor is the "Supercharger"

 

This was a huge leap and engine power rose sharply before the War. You were suddenly able to make much smaller, lighter, yet more powerful engines which could cruise higher and farther, since you the drag at high altitude is much lower. 

For Example the Normally Aspirated Wright R-790  could only produce 220hp for take-off, it's later cousin, the Supercharged R-760 despite it's slightly smaller displacement could produce 350hp for take-off and had much better performance at altitude. 

 

All that to get to the simple point of: ATA indicated how much pressure that Supercharger is producing in your intake Manifold. 

RPM are simple "Revolutions per Minute" of the Engine, in other words how many Rotations the Crankshaft makes in a Minute. 

This is regulated by the Propeller blades being adjusted to a finer or coarser angle. I'll put in an Illustration below. 

 

1.4 ata@2600RPM are appopiate for take-off (don't forget to open all radiators fully)

1.3 ata@2400RPM are the appropiate setting for climbing. You can use them for 30 Minutes.

1.15ata@2200RPM are the Maximum Cruise Power you can use for eternity (or until fuel runs out)

 

It's a Two Speed Supercharger, so at 3000m it automatically switches up to 2nd gear, which is the high altitude gear. 

Don't forget to switch down Manually when you dive, or you may Over-Rev your engine. 

Also remember to make only gently movements on the throttle. 

 

The big, snail looking thing is the Supercharger, basically a Big Fan. 

 

db_605.jpg

 

imagesbb.jpg

 

Excellent explanation Mr Klaus_Mann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decieded to write here than make new topic, how do you spot anything on the ground when you are 6-7 or even 8k m high? Last time i barely spoted train and i was not high enough (my dive was short and i had less than 2s to aim and drop bomb). There is no way to see tanks or anything when you are so high, why don't we have binoculars or something? I don't know if pilots used them in ww2 but i think it would be smart if they did.

Edited by InProgress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decieded to write here than make new topic, how do you spot anything on the ground when you are 6-7 or even 8k m high? Last time i barely spoted train and i was not high enough (my dive was short and i had less than 2s to aim and drop bomb). There is no way to see tanks or anything when you are so high, why don't we have binoculars or something? I don't know if pilots used them in ww2 but i think it would be smart if they did.

8k...in a StuKa? You're doing it wrong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got weird problem, i had good temp water and oil, RPM 90%. 0.7ata (a bit more) was at 9k (i know 7000m is service celing) but my altimeter got reseted or something, i was at 6k and then it just went to 0 and started showing slowly 0,2 and more. Then i end up with broken engine. Why is that?

 

oh oh i see now, i was not 9km... now i see it shows 0,1 km (100m) and resets and add numbers on counter there. So i was at 2900m and my engine was damaged for some reason.

Edited by InProgress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got weird problem, i had good temp water and oil, RPM 90%. 0.7ata (a bit more) was at 9k (i know 7000m is service celing) but my altimeter got reseted or something, i was at 6k and then it just went to 0 and started showing slowly 0,2 and more. Then i end up with broken engine. Why is that?

That sounds like a bug. Best report that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just happend again... was flaying for few min only 1.30 ata 90% RPM, 85% throttle, water and oil  more less 90C, 2km high, engine broken. I am a bit new to this game but yesterday i was doing the same stuff and had no problem with engine.

 

Water and oil radiators open 100%

Edited by InProgress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to stick to 1.25 ATA and 2400 RPM in climb mode. Everything above that will break your engine in minutes. Both throttle and RPM should be at 85%.

Edited by Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never used 1800 :( it's always disabled in multiplayer for some reason. But i like 1000 one, it's good for buildings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be it SC500/250 combo or single SC1000, I never take 1000kg bombload if the outside temp is higher than 25°C

The climb is just painfully slow. Keep that for autumn and winter environments.

The basic SC500+4xSD70 or 3xSC250 is lighter, almost as good and more versatile.

 

For the engine part, as Matt said, keep it at 2400rpm for the climb, and try not to exceed 1.25ATA. (The official limit is 1.32ATA)

Forget about the throttle% stuff, as it's not optimal at all. A fixed 85% throttle will give you anywhere between 1.25 and 1.0ATA depending on altitude and supercharger gear.

 

For example, around 2500m of altitude you can run at 100%  throttle with no risk as the manifold pressure won't get above 1.2ATA anyway

 

Just read your gauges and you will be better off.

Edited by F/JG300_Gruber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am fine now, i guess 1000 is great to bomb factories or ships, 500 is nice for smaller ships, bridges or single buildings. But i find dive hard with 1000kg, you need to drop it when still high or you will booom...

 

btw is it worth to use delay for bomb when attacking ships or bridges? Won't bomb just sink deep and explosion will be smaller and weaker?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll try to explain it in simple terms.

All ingame Aircraft have Supercharged Internal Combustion Engines.

Internal Combustion requires a certain ratio of Fuel, in our Case Aviation Grade Gasoline, and Air. Normally the perfect ratio of Air to Fuel in an ideal engine is 15:1, or 15 Weight Units of Air for one Weight unit of fuel. This can however vary, for example the Choke on a Car or the Primer on an Aircraft can reduce this to 3-5:1 for Startup, as the fuel doesn't fully vaporize at these low temperatures, while at very high temperatures in a hot running Air Cooled engine you can reach Mixtures of up to 25:1, but 15:1 is still the optimum you want.

This means that in order to generate power you have to Mix large amounts of Air with very small amounts of fuel through means of a Carburettor in which the fuel is mixed into the intake Air and vapourizes in it.

Getting the small amounts of fuel there thus is almost no Challenge, so the quest is for the greatest Amount of Air to maintain roughly a 15:1 Mixture.

Now a Naturally Aspirated engine is limited to whatever it can suck in at Ground Pressure, which is why you often see Ludicrously Large Air Intakes on Naturally Aspirated Sports Cars and American V8 Muscle Cars.

This automatically leads us to Manifold Pressure, units are ATA for Germans (ca 1.0 ata at Ground Level), mm in Mercury for Russians (ca. 750mmHg on the Ground) and Inches in Mercury (29.92 InHg on the Ground).

The Airflow in the Intake Manifold is controlled by the Throttle Valve in the Carburettor. At 0% throttle this Valve is almost closed, so the Cylinders can suck in only very small amounts of Air-Fuel Mix, creating low pressure in the intake. This is called "Idle". At Idle the Airpressure inside may be as low as 10% of the surrounding Air, when the throttle is wide open, the pressure inside the Manifold will almost equalize with the Ouside Pressure.

Now here is the Problem with Naturally Aspirated Engines, especially in Aircraft. In our Atmospehere the Pressure at 5500m is half as much as on the Ground, at 11000m it's 25% and so on, and at the same rate engine power would decrease as well. This means your performance would drop sharply the higher you got, you would really struggle with 5000m and more.

In the end the only solution to get more engine power at higher alitudes then is to get more air into the intake. In WWI some German engines were equipped with a Second Throttle which when opened at 1500m would supply the engine with a bit more air, but this wasn't very effective.

One Option was to pump more of the Surrounding Air into the Engine through means of a Compressor driven by the Engine. This Compressor could Charge more Air into the Manifold, even at high Altitude it could provide the engine with as much Air as it would have on the Ground.

So instead of your German Engine having 0.5 ata at 5500m, you still could use 1.0 ata at that altitude, thus providing you with 4 times as much power at that altitude as your Naturally Aspirated Counterpart.

You could even use that Compressor to Boost you Power at Lower Altitude, since it could deliver much more than Ground Pressure into the intake.

This Compressor is the "Supercharger"

This was a huge leap and engine power rose sharply before the War. You were suddenly able to make much smaller, lighter, yet more powerful engines which could cruise higher and farther, since you the drag at high altitude is much lower.

For Example the Normally Aspirated Wright R-790 could only produce 220hp for take-off, it's later cousin, the Supercharged R-760 despite it's slightly smaller displacement could produce 350hp for take-off and had much better performance at altitude.

All that to get to the simple point of: ATA indicated how much pressure that Supercharger is producing in your intake Manifold.

RPM are simple "Revolutions per Minute" of the Engine, in other words how many Rotations the Crankshaft makes in a Minute.

This is regulated by the Propeller blades being adjusted to a finer or coarser angle. I'll put in an Illustration below.

1.4 ata@2600RPM are appopiate for take-off (don't forget to open all radiators fully)

1.3 ata@2400RPM are the appropiate setting for climbing. You can use them for 30 Minutes.

1.15ata@2200RPM are the Maximum Cruise Power you can use for eternity (or until fuel runs out)

It's a Two Speed Supercharger, so at 3000m it automatically switches up to 2nd gear, which is the high altitude gear.

Don't forget to switch down Manually when you dive, or you may Over-Rev your engine.

Also remember to make only gently movements on the throttle.

The big, snail looking thing is the Supercharger, basically a Big Fan.

db_605.jpg

imagesbb.jpg

Nice explanation :)

 

OP see if you can fly with a squad, you can learn so much more in a few minutes compared to figuring it out alone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm using them.

 

For ship, if you direct hit, the bomb will "stick" to it (let's assume it perforated the hull) and explode within the ship. No problem at all.

For bridges, I don't really know, it may depend about what bridge you are talking about. One thing I'm sure it's that for small wooden bridges, a near miss where the bomb explode in the water right next to the bridge usually destroys it. But I don't know if a direct hit makes a bigger blast or not.

 

Plus using delays enables you to drop from a much lower altitude without risking blowing yourself up. You will be more precise.

 

I'm using 2s delay for anything up to 500kg, and 3s for 1000kg and 1800kg. Works perfect for me even dropping at 250km/h

Edited by F/JG300_Gruber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm usually good with using a center-line 500, and wing bombs. 

Improves performance a bit, and the payload is still effective enough. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fuel is a big thing in the stuka, a full tank gives a huge range ,which is not even almost needed, most of the time i do bombing runs at 30% and only the really far targets get me on reserve (ofc cruise settings and fuel saving settings)  makes taking off and maneuvering way easier 

 

at 270km/h you need 2m11s to travel one block on the map (the big one = 3 small blocks) and a full tank with 840!!!liters gives 3:40 hours at 300km/h at 5k altitude ,do your math

 

that tool is also good to have :   http://il2map.info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

30% is not good idea, i usually take 60%, i often get attacked and there is not much you can do, fuel leak happens often, so it's nice to have a bit more fuel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too am having issues with the Stuka, I have seen the charts and have tried and tried but still something isn't right. Have seen 3 tutorials, but nothing on the Engine Management and say percentages to use I know everyone could be different but, just a basic management tree so us new guys can actually get more than 5min into a mission. That would be so useful. Example.

 

Take Off

Climb

Dive

Cruise

Landing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what i do:

Take off, RPM 100%, oil and water radiators open, i turn off bomb fuse just in case, tailwheel locked, throttle slowly 100%, when 190-200km/h I start climbing.

 

Climb, RPM 75%, throttle 85% (when engine hot I go to 75% and cool it down), climb slowly, dont get below 200km/h, it will take more less 10min to climb high.

 

Dive, spot target, turn on airbreaks, turn on siren, throttle idle and roll left or right(depends on which side is target) aim at it and drop bombs(dont forget to arm them... happend to me once) then climb fast, airbreaks and siren off, throttle is your thing if you want climb 80% if not just fly on 60 or something.

 

I am still working on landing.

 

The higher you are the more time to aim you have, I find it difficult and dangerous to dive when below 2000m. Well at least at 90 degrees, which is most accurate bombing.

Edited by InProgress
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too am having issues with the Stuka, I have seen the charts and have tried and tried but still something isn't right. Have seen 3 tutorials, but nothing on the Engine Management and say percentages to use I know everyone could be different but, just a basic management tree so us new guys can actually get more than 5min into a mission. That would be so useful. Example.

 

Take Off

Climb

Dive

Cruise

Landing

 

- Take off : Radiators full open, full throttle and 2500rpm (less than max RPM), then reduce both to climb parameters as soon as you are above treetop level. You can very easily get past the critical point where your engine will break, but not immediately. And after 5min or sometimes more, the engine will smoke and die, and a lot of people don't understand why. So take off with max power, and once you are slightly above the trees, start reducing the propeller pitch (rpm) and then the throttle. Typing in the chat in the takeoff phase is also a great way to kill your engine in that manner. 

 

- Climb : 1.20/1.25ATA 2400rpm, rads full open.

 

- Dive : 0 throttle, minimum RPM, rads closed. (dont forget to re-open them after the dive !!!)

 

- Cruise : it depends, if I'm alone, 1.1ATA and 2200rpm, and 0.95ATA/2100rpm if flying with others. When fleeing after an attack, I usually push up to  1.2ATA/2300rpm for 20/30km and reduce after. When cruising I try to maintain 80/90°C to the oil and water temp. so if oil or water start going below 80°C, I close the rad a little bit (by 20%) and monitor what it does. No specific settings here as it depends about a lot of parameters.

 

- Landing : I start the approach by setting the prop pitch for 2400rpm (maybe 85% or something like this) and leave it here during all the landing procedure. 

Reduce throttle to 0 and keep the plane level by pulling the stick as it decelerates. Extend the flaps when around 210km/h and put back some throttle once reaching 180km/h. 

On final with full flaps, I'm usually playing with the throttle a bit to adjust the rate of descent, but usually engine is running around 1800/1900rpm (remember that the prop pitch is still set for 2400rpm).

Rads, I usually don't care at this point, but most likely the same as for cruise setting.

 

 

I emphasize on the fact that you should quickly try to learn to read the instruments in the cockpit and forget about the %. You will get more from your engine this way, and it only takes a couple days to be efficient at reading the gauges. 

Edited by F/JG300_Gruber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take off at 100% trottle, open both oil and water radiators. After getting above tree level, immediately lower RPM to 60% and trottle to 85%. This way, you can gain speed. After 3-4 minutes, reduce trottle to 75% and keep climbing in a shallow climb. I always bring 100% fuel because my tanks always get shot, and I start leaking fuel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is all about viewing your temperatures. You can not say open your radiator flaps so far, as it very much depends on the air temperature. When you fly on the Stalingrad summer map, you might need full opened flaps for quite a long time to not overheat, but on autumn and, of course, even more, winter map, you don´t need that far opened radiators.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't the water radiator have a mark for ' normal'. I try to throttle back and close the radiators a bit asap after takeoff and having gained just enough height and speed to retract flaps used for takeoff without hitting the trees in the resulting drop in altitude.

 

 

There's a mark for 1/3 open and 2/3 open.

I don't recommend closing the radiators before having reached the desired altitude. During the climb the temp will always exceed 100°C with radiators fully open, unless it's really, really cold outside... The 87 is already draggy as hell so there is no noticeable gain in speed with the rads closed. Keep the fully open to get the maximum climb performance without overheating.

 

For the flaps part, don't retract them straight away, that's a common mistake that a lot of people make leading them to stall and crash.

Once in climb settings (1.25ATA 2400rpm), push slightly on the nose to keep the plane in level flight or in a very shallow climb (+1m/s) and let the plane accelerate to 220-230km/h. Then only retract the flaps and accompany the attitude change with the stick. This way you'll hardly loose any altitude, and already be at climb speed once flaps are fully retracted.

 

Same goes for landing procedure, don't use the flaps as airbrakes, as the nose will skyrocket to space. Just cut throttle and wait for the plane to get below 200-210km/h in level flight before putting flaps. The plane will be much more friendly this way.

Edited by F/JG300_Gruber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Stuka for cruising I use RPM 67% (@ 1.2ata) and in combat 80% (@ 1.3 ata). Rads 1/3 open. Never overcooked my engine this way.

 

Only for take off RPM 100%, full trottle, rads fully open but don't push it for longer than a minute. Actually as soon as I lift off I start reducing RPM 90- 80- 75% and climb @ 1.3 ata. Retracting flaps at 230 km/h (nose will pitch down for a brief moment so counteract with joystick) and I keep about the same speed to climb. Once on desired altitude I close rads to 1/3 and continue in cruise mode.

 

For landing RPM 60%, @ 0.6ata, takeoff flaps and gradually reduce trottle to slowdown to 210km/h. Then cut trotlle and extend full flaps as I get close to runway.

 

Possibly there is a better way but this works for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent explanation Mr Klaus_Mann

this doesnt work. when you reduce rpm to 2250, automaticly ATA is 0. 

so is there some simple..few word explanation how to?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this doesnt work. when you reduce rpm to 2250, automaticly ATA is 0. 

so is there some simple..few word explanation how to?

 

Are you trying to reduce rpm by reducing the throttle? Use the throttle to control your manifold pressure. Use the prop rpm control to set your rpm. They're two separate controls. 77% throttle and 76% prop rpm = 2250 rpm @ 1.15 ata for me.

Edited by RobCarter3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you trying to reduce rpm by reducing the throttle? Use the throttle to control your manifold pressure. Use the prop rpm control to set your rpm. They're two separate controls. 77% throttle and 76% prop rpm = 2250 rpm @ 1.15 ata for me.

so, to set propeler  blades angle, not engine power. yes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...