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Feathered_IV

German radio discipline?

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I was browsing through the 2gb of files in Bos's Update folder, and noted with great interest that all the speech samples for the AI are in there. The quality of voice acting of ones virtual-wingmates can make or break a flight sim for me (the main reason why clod has never captured my imagination). With that in mind I was interested to see how these ones sounded.

 

The Russian voices seem quite good, but I noticed the German voices are a bit similar to the original Il-2 in as much that the voice actors sound unduly alarmed and very harsh, even when changing formation.

 

This made me wonder, what sort of radio discipline did the Luftwaffe practice in real life. Did they bark at one another as a matter of routine, and were they well known for shouting and becoming highly emotional during combat? I understand the British thought the Polish flyers were unnecessarily emotive. Did German airmen have a similar reputation?

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If i recall corrcectly from my last reading of The First and the Last, Galland made it sound like it was utter chaos on the radio once combat was joined.

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This is pure speculation, but the Prussian military tradition did emphasise individual initiative and personal bravery, which might make for less disciplined and more agitated radio communication.

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This is pure speculation, but the Prussian military tradition did emphasise individual initiative and personal bravery, which might make for less disciplined and more agitated radio communication.

Mind you that not every young man flying for the Luftwaffe was a Prussian aristocrat  :salute: 

 

I'd say the LW radio comms was just like everybody's elses - radio silence, some specific phrases and code words, utter chaos in actual combat, and also sense of humor sometimes.

 

I also listened to the files, and I actually really liked them, I personally found them to be better than old Il-2. The phrases seem to be 'historically correct', they call the boogies 'Indianer' in one of the files IIRC and that's the most important thing I guess and adds a lot to the immersion. The 'actors' seem to have slightly different accents, too, so it's not all just generic German - very nice touch. What I don't like besides the slightly overexcited intonation is the lack of more specific phrases like Marie, Lisa, Rolf, Moebelwagen, Radfahrer etc., They could say 'Solo' instead just 'gestartet', but that's just a small detail.

 

Also, German as such might sound a bit harsh to someone's ears, some pilots could have been emotional why others were very quiet. This is just a generic voicepack that has to fit all occasions when put together and I am aware of the technical difficulties when making this kind of work. I haven't even heard it in actual game yet so I guess it's too soon to judge anything, but it sounds very interesting and authentic imho. I am not a real German though so what do I know :D 

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Mind you that not every young man flying for the Luftwaffe was a Prussian aristocrat :salute:

 

Of course not, and that's not what I was implying. I'm talking of the German military system as a whole, which was built on the basis of the Prussian tradition in the later half of the 19th century, and which survived in the German armed forces right up to the end of WW2.

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Just listened to it. It's ok, not excellent, a bit over the top in some cases, in others not immersive enough, you can hear it's just a normal guy speaking, not a pilot and not used to saying such things.

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Of course not, and that's not what I was implying. I'm talking of the German military system as a whole, which was built on the basis of the Prussian tradition in the later half of the 19th century, and which survived in the German armed forces right up to the end of WW2.

 

Oh yes, that is very much true and I didn't mean to contradict what you were saying at all. :biggrin:  This was definitely the case with organisation and approach to mission planning and such. What I wanted to say was that in the actual units, there were men from all walks of life who didn't necessarily had these 'Prussian' principles in them (as per upbringing and education.) The organisation was very good, but these were still just normal people and not clones of your typical 'ze German pilot' stereotype from the movies - a chap with cold eyes, pale hair and a soul of a T-1000.  :lol:  The discipline in training was there though and so were the emotions in actual combat. The radio communication was just standard and very disciplined actually, as breaking radio silence for no good reason, or talking unnecessarily too much in combat could cost someone's life. I personally wouldn't say that the Prussian tradition did make for less disciplined and more agitated comms.

 

Coming back to the old Il-2 voicepack - when the game was brand new in early 2000s, a few friends paid a visit to a high scoring 109 pilot from the 13./JG52. They took a complete PC with HOTAS, pedals and everything for him to have a go in 'his' G-2 again. He loved the sim, but he noticed and commented on the comms, that it was a complete nonsense, apparently they were quiet for the most of the time.

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Well, about all I can add is from the US perspective. My father who as a AO2 with VBF-16 in the Pacific had plenty of time to listen to radio traffic would always comment to me on war movie pilot radio chatter, "Ah, bull hockey, they didn't talk on the radio like that!" So, eh, for what it's worth. Who knows with the Germans? I think Robo is right, standing orders were to maintain radio discipline at all times. I imagine it was forgotten at times in the midst of a furball, but since the base was listening (and thus your commanders) no one would have thumbed their nose at the regulation as it would have been to the detriment of the others in your squadron.

Edited by Grifter

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well you know we spaniards are lazy bums, german are overworking beer drinkers, english have an odd sense of humour and greek well you know :)

 

so i get the germans were harsch on the radio

Edited by raaaid

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Some Luftwaffe slang and radio codes, from "The Battle of Britain" by Richard Townsend Bickers (Prentice Hall Press, New York, 1990) :

 

Kirchturm: (Church Tower) Own height in hundreds of meters

Hanny: (Johnny or “bloke”) Enemy height

Caruso: Course

Zirkus über: (Circus over) Assemble at

Gartenraum: (Garden room) Airfield

Horrido: I have shot down an enemy aircraft

Ente: (Duck) Range from enemy aircraft

Bodo: Unit headquarters or own base

Orkan: Enemy’s speed

Tuba: Bearing

Pauke-Pauke!: Attack!

Viktor: Understood

Ich berühre: (I touch) I have seen the target

Otto-Otto: Target in searchlight

Normaluhr in: (Usual time) Wait at

Ich habe Durst: (I am thirsty) I am short of fuel

Radfahrer: (Cyclist) Own single-engine aircraft

Möbelwagen: (Furniture van) Own twin-engine aircraft

Dicke Möbelwagen: (Big furniture van) Own three-engine aircraft

Feindlich jäger: Enemy fighters

Autos: (Cars) Enemy twin-engine aircraft

Dicke Autos: (Big cars) Enemy four-engine aircraft

Freie Bahn: (Free road) Enemy fighters breaking formation

Donnerkeil: (Thunderbolt) Night attack

Stacheldraht: (Barbed wire) Flying within certain height limits forbidden

Objekt: (Object) Designated object being defended e.g. town, port, ship

Mauerblume: (Wallflower) Contact with the enemy

Spielbeginn: (Start of the game) Enemy formation recognized at (followed by place name)

Halbzeit: (Half time) Abandoning engagement

Ich suche: (I am looking) I haven’t seen, or lost, the target

Gehen Sie ins Vorzimmer: (Go into the anteroom) …Wait

Konkurrenz: (Competition) Danger warning

Weiss: (White) Fighter operating with searchlights

Schwarz: (Black) fighter operating without searchlights.

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Gartenraum: (Garden room) should be Gartenzaun (garden fence).

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Horrido! is equal to Tally Ho! and could be used all day long for greeting, best wishes, congratulations etc. no specific use.

 

Best, Allons!

Edited by Stab/ZG26-Allons

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Well, after listening to the German comms in the actual mission, and not just playing samples from the game folder, it sounds very very unnatural and way too harsh.  :(

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Well, after listening to the German comms in the actual mission, and not just playing samples from the game folder, it sounds very very unnatural and way too harsh.  :(

Agree.

It´s even worse then in the old IL-2. Atleast we have now some more lines, so it don´t get repetitive too fast.

 

Btw. I would do additional voices for free :biggrin:

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Radio coms, at least the german on that i understand, is really bad.

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