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Fatherland = Germany

Motherland = Russia

Yeah, if your daddy is German and your mum is Russian.

 

Otherwise, pretty much all (at least most European) countries are refered to as both depending on the situation.

 

Example: My own country Denmark is usually refered to as the "fatherland" (fædrelandet) in a military context, but the personification of the country is a woman "mother Denmark" (Mor Danmark).

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Funnily enough, I can't recall the UK as having been a "fatherland" or a "motherland". We call it lots of other things - historically (and - debateably - regrettably) often coupled with "empire" in one way or another, but fatherland, motherland, homeland... seem strange.

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Funnily enough, I can't recall the UK as having been a "fatherland" or a "motherland". We call it lots of other things - historically (and - debateably - regrettably) often coupled with "empire" in one way or another, but fatherland, motherland, homeland... seem strange.

Probably because the UK didn't historically think of itself as a nation state but as an empire. There was a clear distinction between the "Homeland" of England and the "Empire" of the British crown.

 

In places like Russia (which was also an empire - at least in name) it was easier to get the two mixed up, because its dominion was primarilly over neighboring countries and not over places half the World away.

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There is even a graph of how often words "fatherland", "motherland" and "homeland" have been used in English texts during last couple of centuries.

https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-399fa0f541417c0e78405411ff75cdce-p

So the term "fatherland" gained popularity during the period of national awaking of many nations (mid-19th century), but took big hits, when English speaking nations were waging wars against Germany. 

Edited by II./JG77_Kemp
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Funnily enough, I can't recall the UK as having been a "fatherland" or a "motherland". We call it lots of other things - historically (and - debateably - regrettably) often coupled with "empire" in one way or another, but fatherland, motherland, homeland... seem strange.

God save the Queen! For Old Nosey! Rule Britannia! 

 

The extent of my knowledge of British patriotic phrases comes from Mount & Blade: Napoleonic lol

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