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NZTyphoon

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  1. You must mean 126 & 127 Wings. I have some 402 and 421 Sqn material, none of which include ammunition expenditure forms. It does, however, remind me that 421(RCAF) Squadron started using 150 octane fuel in February 1945: I have found that using the following search terms are useful when digging through the National Archives: the ORBs are filed under Air 27; the star represents a squadron number, followed by a full stop then the type of ORB: air 27: squadron number: * . summary of events air 27: squadron number: * . record of events
  2. I have some for Spitfire IXs, but none of them as yet include ammunition expenditure forms, because they aren't always included in the National Archives files. To explain, there were two different ORBs filed by RAF units: The Summary of Operations books were usually similar to diary entries, detailing the day to day activities of the unit. These SoEs varied in the amount of detail that was included. The SoEs were also more likely to include the expenditure forms - but that seems to depend on how complete the records were and whether or not the NA staff scanned them into the system. Here's the 130 Sqn SoE entry for early October 1944: The Record of Operations books often listed the aircraft used on each operation; depending on the squadron, they could show pilot, serial number and sometimes the code letter. Again, the amount of detail included varied from unit to unit. Here's the RoE 130 Sqn October 2 and 3 1944:
  3. Good catch: there was a distinct difference between the amount of ammunition carried on operations by 130 Sqn. Spitfire XIVs with the C wings versus the E. Also note that in September '44, 130 Sqn was still part of the ADGB, whereas by October they had joined 2 TAF September '44: 20mm and .303 November and December 1944: continuing from October 20mm & .50 Finding ORBs that also include
  4. This is from 130 Sqn's Record of Operations book, October 1944: this was the first month that the unit was re-equipped with .50 armed Spitfire XIVs.
  5. Here's 610 Sqn's full Operations Record Book for August 1944, sans the last page that I have already posted. The entry for August 8 describes how... by August 13... So, yes the ORB shows that 610 Sqn's Spitfire XIVs flew combat operations without the .303s. 610 Sqn were slated to conduct sweeps over the continent, only to have operations canceled due to the weather or because, as already mentioned by 41Sqn_Skipper, ADGB required that stations flying ops against the V-1s were to be used in rotation. I'm checking the ORBs for other Spitfire XIV squadrons, but some were more detailed than others.
  6. From 610 Sqn's Summary of Events book, August 1944, they stayed operational while their Spitfire XIVs were being modified (see last paragraph of General )
  7. Just to clear up any confusion, the 'E' or (E) suffix was, at the time, the informal squadron or RAF applied designation for Mk XIVs armed with .50 cal weapons; From Shores and Thomas' 2nd Tactical Air Force, Volume IV: The bubble canopied versions were recorded as F. Mk. XIVEs on the aircraft data cards because of the new canopy, not the .50 cal and 20mm armament which, as noted by Thomas, became standardized in April 1944: as it was, the majority of the bubble canopied variants were built as F.Rs.
  8. It's interesting to note that 610 Sqn, at least, had the .303s removed from its Mk XIVs during the Anti-diver campaign, then replaced them in early September - starting on September 4 - as they started operations over the continent, prior to moving to 2 TAF. 610 also started using 90 gallon tanks: 402(RCAF) Squadron's August 1944 Summary of Events notes the conversion from Spitfire IXs to Mk XIV Es on August 9; their Mk IXs were delivered to 91 Sqn. It's notable that there was no transition period as the new aircraft were operational the next day: "Pilots were very pleased with the performance and easy handling...": the last page shows Equipment: 21 Spitfire XIV E on strength as of August 31st, 1944' Flying Times 485 sorties...Operational day 29 sorties...Non-operational day
  9. According to Christopher Shores & Chris Thomas' 2nd Tactical Airforce Volume 2, the Spitfire XIV units that joined 2 TAF were rearmed with .50 cals: the first of the XIV squadrons flew over to B.82, Grave and joined 125 Wing on the last day of September '44, having replaced the Spitfire IX units.
  10. I have a copy of Invasion Airfields Then and Now : unfortunately, a friend borrowed it, so I can't get it back until NZ relaxes the national lockdown to level-2.
  11. Another loading used was wing bombs plus a slipper tank: This photo of a 74 Sqn Spitfire XVIE shows good details of the wing racks; in fact, it's a good photo that, when blown up to full size, shows all sorts of clear details;
  12. I'm assuming that George Keefer was flying MV263 GCK by March '45, although, of course, being Wing Commander, his Spitfire isn't mentioned in the 41 Sqn Records of Events or Summary of Events ORBs.
  13. Doh! (facepalm here) You're right - I missed reading the 45 Gal LRT in the first columns of the LOADS CARRIED/LOADS EXPENDED...
  14. The following comes from a supplementary booklet, dated September 1944, that was issued with the Spitfire Mk IX Pilot's Notes AP. 1565J: this shows that Spitfire IXs (and presumably XIVs) that carried both fuselage and wing bombs, were fitted with bomb selector switches: Paragraphs 43 through 46 explain how the switch panel was used, noting that the pilot could select which bombs to drop, plus there was the option of dropping all three as a salvo. Those Spitfires that carried the fuselage bomb had the simpler bomb fusing/ master switch Paragraph 42 and as shown in the XIV/XIX Pilot's Notes:
  15. Really interesting info Luke, thanks for that. Also notable is that long range tanks aren't listed in any of the 'LOADS CARRIED/EXPENDED' columns...does this mean that they weren't used, or were they overlooked for some reason?
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