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Mmaruda

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About Mmaruda

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  1. Personally I hate War Thunder, simply because it's an online arena type of game. I guess when some friends almost forced me to play Falcon with them, I learned that the most important part (at least for me) in a sim, is actually being able to fly missions in something that gives you an impression of an actual military operation. I did some mental time travelling to the 90's, looked up old magazines I still have and what simulators were out then and what I played myself and why I even got into IL-2 in the first place. Let's face it, early sims were nothing but air shooters from a first person perspective with a cockpit view. Jane's was a super hype brand back then, but stuff like Navy Fighters, USAF, ISAF were close to Ace Combat, than DCS. I think the reason why everyone remembers this age as the glory days, was that there was a lot of titles with a vast scale of realism. Some people played Falcon and read manuals others just had fun in something like Dawn Patrol or Wings of Glory and there was no general consensus as to what was a true simulator and what wasn't. Hell, even Strike Commander was considered a sim by the reviewers from that time and I don't think anyone questioned it. And I grew up on games like this. The reason I got into serious sims like IL-2, was because there was nothing in-between. I simply had no choice. Same goes for jet sims. I found reading 500+ page manual a chore, but it was either that or no flying at all, and for some reason, the more I learned, the more I liked it. But if I was to teach a new person, even the basics of flying like a 109 in BOS, I wouldn't know where to begin. But to go back to WT, I think it's good that it's there and bad at the same time. Good, because anyone can get into it and bad because it's an online game that is based around scores and unlocking stuff, rather than playing a virtual pilot. Just to add some perspective too, I recently played through Ace Combat 7. The game has great single player, missions, story etc, brilliant graphics and awesome planes. But it's an arcade shooter first and foremost. That said, while combat is basically just shooting down hundreds of enemy planes with a press of a button, it's not really easy. Hell, I played through all of the series and 7 is by far the hardest of them all IMHO. The game actually does have some sprinkles of realism - you stall when doing too much Gs, your missiles are rear-aspect heaters, so you best fire them from behind and that actually forces a player to do a lot of manoeuvring, with most real life stuff kind of working. And there is also some sections where you have to show some precise flying (obligatory Ace Combat tunnel run and canyon run). Honestly, if the game was less about fighting large amounts of enemies and didn't have arsenals like 100 missiles per plane, this could actually work as something similar to those lighter sims of the 90's. Still, I think I have been spoiled, because I couln't enjoy myself like I used to with this series. Having played proper sims, there is something wrong with dogfigting in jets all the time. In BMS or DCS, it's like oh I got a bogey, I'll soft lock him and fire and AMRAAM, oh he is turning, probably shot at me and it went pitbull, do a split S fire the trash and look behind, all clear, good, reacquire and rinse and repeat. I can could probably count like 5 times I merged in any modern jet flight sim to actually have to dogfight and it's scary, cause nothing tells you there is a heater coming for your butt. Probably why I don't really play these anymore, you study the manuals, you can be good at operating the plane quite fast, if you have method of learning, but communication and situation awareness will make your brain melt. IL-2 is closer to Ace Combat, but with none of that fantasy crap, but I don't think you can enjoyably play it with realism turned down like a semi-arcade game - 1946 had more realism tuning options and I think was more accessible for that matter. Anyway, perhaps that is actually what would come in handy - more realism otpions with presets - arcade: simplified flight model, guns with unlimited ammo and basically working like lasers (I don't really like the aim assist circle); simcade: no CEM, easy ground handling, easier landings, some leniency for bullet drop and accuracy and AI that pretends to put up a fight but actually has a death wish and realism mode, which is what we all fly, because we're degenerates. 😄
  2. Quick update, just for knowledge sake. I did some testing. It appears to have nothing to do with rudder pedal. I think the problem started when they updated the game, so that it ids the controllers by their guid and assigns them as joy_0, joy_1 etc and then bases the control map around those definitions. This means that when you windows device order changes, IL-2 will still keep your bindings intact, but for some reason x and y axis cannot be assigned to toe brakes. I tested it by trying to assign joystick and throttle slew to it and it didn't work as well.
  3. It seems to be an old bug, because I remember having to do this... IDK more than a year ago, though it definitely worked at some point. I tested it today and I still cannot assign rudder axis for toe brakes. Good that remembered it and always do backups of joystick configs. I use the Saitek Combat Pros BTW. Still might be worth bringing this to devs' attention. Or at least have someone sticky the solution some place.
  4. Are your toe brakes working on other planes? Anyway, I think this is a bug that with some devices you cannot bind rudder axis in game. Go into your game folder \data\input In the following files you should find: current.actions rpc_wheel_brakes_left, joy2_axis_x, 0| rpc_wheel_brakes_right, joy2_axis_y, 0| current.map action("rpc_wheel_brakes_left_p","State","joy2_axis_x"); action("rpc_wheel_brakes_right_p","State","joy2_axis_y"); Where joy2 is the number of the rudder device in my case. So just try putting whatever number you have for your rudder (you can check that in the devices.txt in the same folder).
  5. I haven't read the whole thread yet, but this specifically caught my eye, as I feel it's worth addressing. Difficulty and time is something I don't think is that much of an issue. It's more of an issue for older people. When I was just student I had 3 months vacation, I had plenty of time for gaming and you can see this with younger folks even now - there have been some tough yet popular games lately. People play all those Souls games all the time, they 100% them and move to new game plus or something, that is a lot of time invested. But then again, all you need to enjoy those is a console and you can buy one for less than a HOTAS goes. Say you have time and even dedication to learn a flight sim - you need a beefy rig for that, but that is just a beginning. You can get a budget joystick, but man, the moment I got my Warthog, I realised that simming has a strong pay to win aspect to it and it's hardware. Air to air refuelling on a CH Hotas was super hard, switching to the Warthog it became a walk in the park. Then you have TrackIR, expensive too, but I can't imagine doing dogfights without it. And just to relate to BOx now, I honestly feel it's impossible to take off in some planes without rudder pedals. Just switching from Pro Saiteks to CH Rudder is an exercise in frustration when it come to the Mig-3. Getting used to headtracking took some time for me, but once I did, I realised I was basically blind without it - that is a big issue too. And add to that that sims are really expensive compared to other games, if you want a full on modern experience. Sure, you can play the old IL-2 or BMS, or stick to the free stuff in DCS but... my point is - unless you have solid job, a lot of this stuff is financially out of your reach. I was only able to get serious about flight sims, when I had a descent salary and it was going well for a time, since I was mostly working night shifts and things were slow, so I had time to read a lot of stuff and learn. But once I started moving up in the world, money no longer being that big of an issue, time suddenly became a huge problem. So to move this back to the question of "simcade', a game you could play with a budget rig, and entry level stick or even a pad, that wouldn't gimp you for not being able to look around with your head and that would be designed in a more traditional manner, say a single player campaign that gradually introduces stuff paired with a story to follow, that would be a good gateway into the world of hardcore sims. This here is gold what you say, because it's true. But I think it's also worth keeping in mind, that in them good old days, there was far less games coming out than now. If there is any merit to the short attention span today, it can only be chalked up to the fact that, every few weeks there is a new game coming out that is super hype and you need to play it and all the youtubers are playing it and telling you to play it etc. It's more a problem of the culture that is so focused on being part of what is currently popular and being part of the conversation rather than people getting bored with games quicker.
  6. If you are familiar with racing sims, then you probably heard the term "simcade". Mostly used as a derogatory term, it refers to games like Gran Turismo or Forza - there are physics and it's sort of realistic, but not really. Now, I've been thinking, why isn't there such a title in the flight sim genre? I know there is War Thunder, but it's more of an online arena game. At some point, Strike Fighters series was dubbed "sim-light", but it got a fairly large following, more so thanks to mods, but it's dead now. I feel like we only have the study-sim / survey sim option. But the lines are getting blurred, as the defining factor would be a clickable pit, since even BOS, the survey sim that it is, has very complex flight and damage model, with stuff like ground handling being a big thing to master, not to mention so many complex systems modelled. But what if we could have a game, that replicated some of the complexities of flight, yet keep things simple and accessible. Say a game, that you could control your plane even with a gamepad, but certain rules of dogfighting would apply, stuff like energy fighting, having to lead your target while shooting, maybe the engine overheating when you push it, but without CEM and something that would actually envolve realistic mission scenarios instead of you being the lone hero to win the war Ace Combat style. While I love realism, sometimes it would be cool to just have some fun from my couch in a relaxed manner, while still being able to feel like just a pilot, having to play to the strengths of the plane and not have 999 missiles on board. I think such a title could also work very well as an introduction for new people, especially with low cost - I mean come on, you need at least good stick and TIR to fly nowadays, while 2 decades ago, you had games like TFX or Janes US Navy Fighters that still were considered sims and these were great fun. Any thoughts? I'd love to read your opinions.
  7. So I figured it out with the 262. It's not really that simple and the easy method does not work for me for some reason. What is even more funny, when I turned easy CEM on, to computer was only able to start one engine. So here it goes: 1. Press E 2. Press 1 to select engine 1 (not sure this is default or my binding) 3. Wait for the 1000 RPM mark and and hold right shift + E 4. Pass the 2000 RPM mark while still holding the keys, use elbo to gently move throttle forward, too fast and you'll overheat the engine 5. Bind right shift + E to the supercharger hat on the throttle like Blitze says or grow a 3rd hand to avoid frustration. 6. Press 1 again to deselect the first engine and press 2 to select second engine 7. Choke the appropriate button on RPM marks and move throttle like with engine number one. 8. Press 0 to select all engines (again probably my bindings) 9. Zero the throttle to even both virtual throttles out, they should be sitting at 15% at idle. Anyway, finally did it late night. I read most of the comments here and I get the impression, maybe wrong, that there is a lot of this condescending attitude that it's simple, but lazy / new players / whoever can't put in the time etc. For everyone it's a different matter. I work a lot of hours during the week, I have very little time to play. My frustration came from the fact that the time I had to check out the 262 was spent on the ground trying to start the engines and failing to understand the process, fiddling with key bindings etc, instead of flying. I feel like it would be more beneficial to the whole community, if people maybe just posted how to do stuff step by step instead of engaging in discussions like "oh it's a flight sim, you want easy go play Ace Combat" or something. Most of us has grown used to how things work and changes are confusing, especially if not explained. More controls get added, but we have them all in one list, maybe the game should have separate menu section of each plane like DCS?
  8. So I press E, then wait till 1000 RPM, then press RShift+E and hold it, then wait till 3000 RPM, then move the throttle with my damn elbow, because the right damn shift is quite the opposite side of the keyboard than E, then wait some more, and when I let it go, the engine dies. I have also tried selecting engine 1 than two, at best I can turn on one engine and usually it's the second one. After that I cannot start rolling to one side only, because either the 262 can not go on grass and just spins, or I have the parking brake on, but can't figure out the key combo, but definitely it's not whichever farthest shift and slash it is that engages it, since this does nothing. My gripe is this, you want to do a realistic startup procedure? Fine do it, but announce it beforehand, write a damn manual and don't rely on Youtubers and maybe just maybe make it a proper one and not just add arbitrary keys to press and hold for a single plane, because it does not make any sense in a game, where all you had to do all those years it press one button... ONCE! Am I angry? Well it's 30 degrees in here, I finished work at 10 pm, I am covered in sweat, I have to go to sleep and get up in 3 hours to make it to the office, so I can actually work, because I don't have air conditioning at home. There is more to this, but I get it, I am overreacting over a video game and there is no excuse for this. Sorry.
  9. Yes. I respect what Requiem does, but let's just say I have an opinion on his work and I will keep it to myself.
  10. So I am wasting my precious time trying to start the damn 262. Apparently you need double throttle now and who knows what. It's probably a super simple thing, but nobody bothered to tell us, they just put Requiem's vis out there and are happy. I have nothing but respect for the guy's work, but I have yet to live to see the day, when they are useful to me.
  11. I get your point completely, but it looks to me like now it's additional key binding for the sake of key bindings. WTH is the difference between pressing "E" and pressing "RShift+E"? It's the same problem I have with "elevator trim" vs "vertical stabiliser" in German planes - I get it, they work differently IRL, but it's the same damn thing in game, I bind these to the same keys. They try to convey that in jets you need electrical power first, then the engine startup, fine. Why does it need more buttons though? It's not like the game has you reenact the actual startup anyway. All it does is makes thing more confusing, without the benefit or actually learning how the machine operated IRL / study aspect - you'd need a clickable cockpit for that.
  12. While this seems like a good update realism-wise, I'd like the option to turn it off and still have realistic engine management like it was up till this point. One reason I love IL-2 BOX so much is because each time a new toy gets released, I can just use my rule of thumb approach and fly anything without any preparation. Having to figure out the start-up procedure for every plane kind of feels like a chore I simply don't have time for. My main reason why I dropped DCS and Falcon (mostly) is because I simply have difficulty finding time to learn. With a new plane for something like IL-2 it was always a matter of minutes to get up to speed with take off and basic flight, now having to read about it and remember it all, not to mention remembering new keys or binding new ones on my already crowded HOTAS will probably significantly decrease my time in the virtual skies. Also, while setting the prop and mixture to max in every plane seems to simplify things a lot, does it work for every plane? And if so, what does it really add to realism, aside from a few more thing one needs to remember before pressing the E key.
  13. I sometimes actually involuntarily move my hands and feet to "manoeuvre for a better firing position".
  14. Just a quick tip, if you are having issues with the game recognising your HOTAS. I recently played with the Steam controller setting to emulate an Xbox360 pad for PS3 Arcade Stick to play Street Fighter. I am amazed at how cool this works and how it solves so many headaches with legacy controller support for some games (no thanks to you, Capcom!), but after going back to IL2, I found none of my controls working. Took me an hour almost with googling, reconnecting stuff and removing configs etc, to figure out it's the Steam Controller settings, so if you are using Steam and for some reason your stick is not working in BoX, just go to Steam>Settings>General Controller Settings and untick every box. This fixed it for me. PS If this was mentioned already, then just delete the post or something. I did a search on the issue and came up empty, so I figured I'd share.
  15. Permadeth is an option in the campaign settings. I would make a "what are you casual" or "git gud" joke here, but honestly, I really recommend turning it on - it completely changes the way you play the game. There is a sense of fear, when going into combat, there is no refly button, you actually approach missions more like a real pilot would - the objective and survival are what matters, you don't get into random fights just to rack up some kills. It's more immersive that way, but also teaches you to fly smarter. I totally understand why someone would like a more relaxed experience, but despite some possible frustration, it just make the game... well richer. Suddenly getting back home in one piece after being damaged becomes an adventure on its own, rather than just "oh, well, I'll have to replay that one".
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