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Sauerkraut-

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About Sauerkraut-

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  1. Great fun everyone! I can't wait for the next one!
  2. Short answer: To conserve fuel at the cost of performance Long answer: The Spit IX and later models and the Merlin P-51's had a three position switch for the supercharger with the following options, in no particular order: High Blower Low Blower Automatic The "Low blower" and "Automatic" positions act as regular switches, and the "High Blower" acts as a momentary switch, meaning the pilot would have to hold the switch in that position. If he let go, it would return to the middle position. Why build it this way? Well, for all intents and purposes, you would want the switch in the "Automatic" position pretty much all the time. However, there may have been times when you were operating at a high altitude, but would want to manually keep the supercharger in "Low Blower" mode to conserve fuel (This works with all aircraft in IL2 BoX BTW). The "High Blower" mode was there only for testing purposes, to ensure that the supercharger gearing was working properly. This is why it was a momentary switch.
  3. Since this thread got revived, I have to say it's really something being able to quickly switch between the different flavors of the 109. It's amazing just how different the early 109's fly compared to the late ones, despite them "looking" very similar. You can really feel just how much heavier the late 109's are compared to the F series. IMO, if you had to put things on a spectrum, the later 109's are much closer to the 190's than they are to the 109 E and F's in terms of how they feel in the cockpit.
  4. Yes, you are right. I was mistaken. The A-26 did use the R-2800's though. It was a speedy sonofabitch.
  5. Those are the engines that the A-26 used, same as the A-20.
  6. The main reason is b/c if you get your ass shot down in the La-5, and your canopy is closed, you can't open it to bail out if you are going too fast. You will face certain death if this happens to you. The same thing occurs in the LaGG, but that thing will almost never be fast enough to exceed the "can't open the canopy" speed. Also, it does increase your visibility by a pretty significant margin.
  7. Good 'ol nitrogen narcosis.
  8. An intuitive way to think about it is that the ailerons essentially become trim tabs (or, more accurately servo or "flettner" tabs in this case) for the entire wing that function in the same way that the rudder tab on late 109's worked.
  9. +1 I'm always for more options on aircraft. I really love ground attacking on blue much more than on reds, you have a larger variety of aircraft capable of the role and they can usually carry more ordinance. This would only expand upon that.
  10. Whatever it was that I just watched, it is clearly a bug, probably introduced with the new aerodynamics that are supposed to take into account compressibility. You should make sure someone from the dev team sees this immediately. Anyway, since the sim is clearly borked here, I'm going to talk about real life performance, not sim performance. The answer is, it depends on your altitude. I'm going to be talking about max dive speeds here. I don't know about dive acceleration, though based on what I've seen I'm assuming that they are pretty close in that regard, so I'm not going to talk about it. Short answer, the spitfire can out dive a 109 at high altitude, but below ~20,000 ft (6k) a 109 will out dive a spitfire. This is because a 109 has a significantly higher maximum IAS than the spitfire, which has one of the lowest allowable IAS of any WWII fighter. However, the spitfire's critical mach number is one of the highest of any WWII fighter. This means that at higher altitudes where the critical mach number becomes the limiting factor, the spitfire can out dive almost any WWII fighter. However, once the dive goes below ~20,000 ft, the maximum IAS becomes the limiting factor for the spitfire. The spitfire will have to slow down or it will start to breakup. As it descends it becomes one of the slowest diving fighters. Anyway, even if the sim wasn't clearly screwed up here, for all practical purposes the spitfire is the slowest diving fighter in the game b/c no one is really ever flying above 6k.
  11. I've been saying this all along, and don't get your hopes up for the P-51 or the P-38 either. All of the american planes are high altitude fighters, and don't do very well at low altitudes. The Dora will be the same way. While the Jug is definitely the worst offender here, don't expect much out of your Yankee planes until 1C creates a way for mission editors to have high altitude objectives.
  12. Fun fact: This is called an "accelerometer" because G-force is a measurement of acceleration.
  13. I'd have to say mine can be found at 1:50 in this video. She is just screamin'
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