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TheKillerSloth

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About TheKillerSloth

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    Sailing, engineering, aviation of course, just about everything World War 2, sports (mostly swimming and some basketball).

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  1. TheKillerSloth

    Brake lever on the Pe2Ser87 query.

    He has set his brakes to the thrustmaster paddles on the throttle, which acts as one axis and not two. So when he is not hitting them at all it is depressing the in game brake lever part way. And when he hits presses them one way it presses the brakes more and when he hits the other side of the paddle it releases the brakes. If he were to leave the brake lever on that axis as you stated he will continue to have problems as he will always have some brake in when not touching it. You just spewed out how the Russian brakes work on most Russian planes, because you saw Pe-2 and brake in the subject and didn't even give him any thought. Also the I-16 uses toe brakes so saying that is how the brakes work on Russian brakes shows even more misinformation on your part. Low effort replies like yours confuse new players. Any ways Melonfish. I have the same throttle has you and i just set the brakes to a button. When you press the button with no rudder input both wheels will brake. And when you press some rudder in either direction it starts to release the brakes slightly on the opposite side to help you with the turn. You don't really need the fine braking inputs that an axis like the paddles would give you. You should be able to taxi just fine and brake as you like by pulsing the button if you need to.
  2. TheKillerSloth

    Brake lever on the Pe2Ser87 query.

    Did you even read his question?
  3. TheKillerSloth

    Brake lever on the Pe2Ser87 query.

    I think if you map it to those paddles it treats it as an axis so when you are not hitting the paddles it is pressing the brakes halfway in. So when you hit it one way it presses the brakes fully and when you hit the other paddle it is releasing the brakes from halfway pressed.
  4. TheKillerSloth

    Is the cockpit clickable in VR?

    The only time I enjoy going through a start up sequence is doing it in an actual airplane. And it is not because hitting switches is inherently enjoyable, it is because it is simply what has to be done if I want to fly. The fun part is in the air managing the plane and getting it to do what you want it to by controlling the attitude of the plane and the engine. That part, the fun part, is where this sim shines. It is way better than Xplane 11 in that regard. I can actually get a feel for what my angle of attack is and how is affecting my plane way better than I do in Xplane.
  5. TheKillerSloth

    U-2VS Tail Gunner

    A forward CG is generally safer than a rear one even though it lowers performance.
  6. TheKillerSloth

    U2 land in a road, then take off

    It is easy to do. I like to pick a house and pretend its mine and try and slow down right next to the front door for some mid mission snacking.
  7. TheKillerSloth

    1CGS Attending Flight-Sim Expo 2019!

    Are you guys going to have a VR setup? I think how well your VR works is a great selling point. Maybe I can attend and make a vacation of it.
  8. TheKillerSloth

    VR and JU88

    You should be able to lean out while taxiing. I'm not sure what settings or other things you may need to look at though. I use VR and taxiing is pretty good for me in the fighters at least.
  9. Was it a fairly fast descent?
  10. The pilot manages RPM via a governor that varies the prop pitch to maintain a constant speed in both the Pe-2 and P-40. This is why they are called constant speed propeller systems. You also have your throttle, which manages manifold pressure. In the Pe-2 you set the throttle and it maintains a constant manifold pressure if possible even when changing altitude. If you go to higher altitudes it may not be possible to maintain though. Then you have RPM control where you set RPM and the governor does its best to maintain that speed by varying the pitch of the props. It is the same for the P-40. Where the two differ though is in control of the manifold pressure. The P-40 throttle position will not maintain a constant manifold pressure for a given throttle setting if you change altitude. So if you have 42 inches at 5000 feet and then descend your manifold pressure will increase if you do not change the throttle position. The Bf-109 manages manifold pressure and prop speed based solely on the throttle position. So for a given position it will maintain a certain manifold pressure and prop speed. You can switch to manual prop pitch control which will allow you to play with changing the prop position. If you go more fine (clockwise on the clock like instrument) your prop speed will increase assuming you leave everything else the same. If you go more course the opposite happens because it is getting a bigger "bite" out of the air. Switching the 109 over to this manual mode is a great way to ingrain in your head how prop pitch affects prop speed, torque, acceleration, etc. Here is a good video by a player of this game, current ATP (airline transport pilot), and a former flight instructor. I would also check out the other 4 videos in this playlist. It might be a good idea to watch them in order. I know I only really covered the operation of these systems, but I don't know much about the actual mechanisms besides some basic principles that I learned from engineering courses. There might be some people around though that are pretty knowledgeable about that. Current constant speed props might not be much different. A lot of mechanical systems used today are surprisingly similar to systems developed in the 30's and 40's.
  11. TheKillerSloth

    Late 1942 Russian / German tank matchup

    T-34s mopped the floors with P III's. Against IV's it was a little more even.
  12. TheKillerSloth

    damage on the tiger

    It sounds to me like maybe the HE rounds "area of effect" damage is maybe getting through the weaker parts of the tiger like the vision slits. This is obviously just speculation. Any ways I plan on picking up tank crew, but I'm in no rush until the damage model is sorted. Correct damage modelling for tanks seems much more important than it is for planes.
  13. TheKillerSloth

    KNIGHTS OF THE AIR Multiplayer Server

    Just wanted to say that I thought the snowy weather mission today was awesome.
  14. TheKillerSloth

    Escorting some 111s on Wings

    Pretty new to recording stuff. I fly in VR and used OBS with a mod to get just 1 eye recorded. If anyone has other good recommendations or general tips for recording while flying in VR it would be appreciated. Thank you.
  15. TheKillerSloth

    Stay alive in multiplayer

    Is it weird that I read this like a poem?
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