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ATAG_Headshot

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  1. The biggest problem from the anthropomorphic controls as I remember it was that if you had a controller with any jitters at all the game will read that as your one whole arm being busy. For example, if your controller that controls your prop pitch moves up and down by even a percent occasionally even if you don't touch it, the game would assume your hand was on the pitch control and not allow you to do anything else on that side of the cockpit. Suddenly you can't change your throttle, trim, or anything else because your one controller has very minor spikes and the game constantly thinks your hand is busy on that one control.
  2. I think part of the reason is that we can't feel anything in a sim. I would expect that taking hits in a real one is something that you could feel through vibration in the air frame and the like, but as we can't feel anything the sound can help to clue you in that you are under fire. I also remember an interview with I believe it was a P-47 pilot who's armor behind the chair was taking hits and he said it sounded like popcorn. Remember, the sound that we hear comes from vibration, and if you take hits to parts of the aircraft that are connected decently to your chair/pedals, you would likely be able to feel it which can possibly also translate into sound.
  3. I thought the noise from the corsair was whistling from the oil coolers, not gun barrels.
  4. As far as gun sounds go they SHOULD be loud. I was talking with an elderly gentleman a few years back and he had a friend who had flown spitfires in the Battle of Britain. He told me that his friend had said that the sound of the guns firing scared the hell out of him the first few times he pulled the trigger and it drowned out everything else. It was loud enough that if you flew a sortie and fired your guns during it your ears would be ringing for hours after!
  5. In Alberta you have about a 20% chance of any kind of weather and a 2% chance of hell freezing over and us not noticing because we just assumed it way another day ending in "Y"
  6. They have been doing a TON of work at the Edmonton one. They are doing full dioramas with costumes, mannequins, and by the Mosquito they even have a German motorcycle with a sidecar and panzerschreck as well as a destroyed car that looks like it was strafed. I go there every few months and every time there is a lot of new stuff. Tons of work! On top of that they have begun the restoration of two P-39s as well.
  7. Edmonton Alberta here. We have a pretty decent aviation museum in town as well! It was built in a double hangar that was used a lot for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. At one point in the second world war it was the busiest airfield in the world, and sent a ton of aircraft through here up to Russia.
  8. IL-2 1946, on Zeke's vs Wildcats. I'm in a corsair and flying a high cover on the expected incoming route for our already very damaged last remaining carrier. I see a Betty bomber heading to the carrier thousands of feet below me and push the nose down while slamming the throttle forward. I pull out of the dive behind him at extreme speed and put the crosshair on target. I begin squeezing the trigger at the same time as the Betty's tail gunner, and within a few seconds I am about to overtake due to the speed I picked up in the dive. I've fired .50 cal rounds all across his plane, and he has returned the favor across mine from his tail gun. I realize that if I pull up and try to go around and line up for another attack that it will be too late for our carrier. With mere seconds to decide what to do I line up my canopy between his left engine and fuselage and put the level of my glass inches below his wing. As the canopy comes under the wing I push the stick forward as hard as I can which raises the tail just enough to slam my vertical stabilizer into the root of the wing. BANG. My plane starts swaying terribly and I prepare to bail out even while trying to pull back up. I kick my rudder a few times to absolutely no effect and the plane is washing back and forth horribly. As I pull up to lose speed to bail out I look behind me and am surprised and awed at what I see. I can clearly see part of the Betty with a view that is not obstructed by my vertical stabilizer. The fuselage and right wing of the Betty are spinning off in one direction while the left wing tumbles away the other way. My vertical stabilizer and rudder are nowhere to be seen but I assume they are part of the cloud of wreckage falling below. As my speed drains off I begin to wrestle control of the plane back. I see huge holes down my wings and my engine is running really rough. The Betty tail gunner had definitely hit its mark and my plane is soon doomed. Thankfully I am also very near my carrier. With the plane dancing left and right beyond my control and my engine slowly losing power I line up on the carrier as quick as I can and drop my flaps. I'm ready to bail at the first sign of trouble... but in the exhilaration of downing the Betty in that manner and surviving I decide that it is time to be cocky and try for a landing. I line up on the carrier, flaps gear and tailhook down and ready, and watch it bounce around my gunsight. Left right left right left right... Have to time it perfectly. At the last moment I fully cut my throttle and drop the corsair HARD on the deck. My landing gear collapses on the impact but the hook snags and drags my plane to a violent stop on the deck. Pulling my head off the dash I look around and see that the world is still again. I can see the waves moving beyond the deck of the carrier that I just saved as my plane sits in a heap but I am alive, and I am dry!
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